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Dahlquist, Kam D, Aikens, Melissa L, Dauer, Joseph T, Donovan, Samuel S, Diaz Eaton, Carrie, Callender Highlander, Hannah, Jenkins, Kristin P, Jungck, John R, LaMar, M Drew, Ledder, Glenn, Mayes, Robert L, Schugart, Richard C, (2017), "An invitation to modeling: building a community with shared explicit practices", PeerJ Preprints, : September, (DOI: 10.7287/peerj.preprints.3215v1). Cited by:

Models and the process of modeling are fundamental to the discipline of biology, and therefore should be incorporated into undergraduate biology courses. In this essay, we draw upon the literature and our own teaching experiences to provide practical suggestions for how to introduce models and modeling to introductory biology students. We begin by demonstrating the ubiquity of models in biology, including representations of the process of science itself. We advocate for a model of the process of science that highlights parallel tracks of mathematical and experimental modeling investigations. With this recognition, we suggest ways in which instructors can call students’ attention to biological models more explicitly by using modeling language, facilitating metacognition about the use of models, and employing model-based reasoning. We then provide guidance on how to begin to engage students in the process of modeling, encouraging instructors to scaffold a progression to mathematical modeling. We use the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium model to provide specific pedagogical examples that illustrate our suggestions. We propose that by making even a small shift in the way models and modeling are discussed in the classroom, students will gain understanding of key biological concepts, practice realistic scientific inquiry, and build quantitative and communication skills.

Hamerlinck, Gabriela, Kidder, Kevin E., LoRe, Sondra, Hale, Alison N., Bishop, Pamela, Jenkins, Kristin, Donovan, Sam (2017), "Professional development in quantitative biology and its relationship to promoting scholarly teaching", Ecological Society of American Annual Conference 2017, : August, (DOI: 10.25334/Q4T95S). Cited by:
Donovan, Sam, LaMar, M. Drew, (2017), "Building a gateway between classrooms and data science using QUBESHub", Gateways 2017, : Ann Arbor, Michigan, October, (DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.5483692.v1). Cited by:

This paper addresses the gap between the practice of biological science and biology education as it pertains to data science and quantitative literacy. We discuss one way to address this gap through the development of a new web application called BioRadiant, an open-source R Shiny application that will be deployed on the scientific gateway QUBES (Quantitative Undergraduate Biology Education and Synthesis).

Monfils, Anna, Linton, Debra, Phillips, Molly, (2017), "Using Natural History Collections to Increase Biodiversity Literacy in Undergraduate Education", 4th Life Discovery - Doing Science Education Conference, : Norman, Oklahoma, October, . Cited by:

A new initiative entitled Biodiversity Literacy in Undergraduate Education (BLUE) aims to bring together communities of biodiversity, data, and education specialists to identify core undergraduate data competencies and standards, delineate learning progressions and develop effective strategies for sustained development and implementation of biodiversity and data literacy education. BLUE participants have also brought some of these strategies into practice by developing example activities.In this workshop, we will present a completed BLUE resource, Angiosperm Reproduction, and Coevolution, in which students use publicly available digitized natural history collections data to analyze spatial co-occurrence of pollinators and the plants they pollinate. Using various data layers and digital resources, students explore the global patterns of species occurrence in a geographic context and form hypotheses related to the interdependence of bats and agave. Specific questions are asked regarding the ecology, distribution, and conservation of both the plant and animal species. Students are asked to propose research questions in a geographic context. The lab is currently being evaluated at Central Michigan University as part of the introductory biology curricula.This module, along with others, is part of a QUBES-Hub Faculty Mentoring Network (FMN). We will also introduce other modules under development, demonstrate the module’s design process, and talk about the ongoing evaluation. Finally, the presenters will explain how participants can get involved in both BLUE and FMNs (https://qubeshub.org/groups/nhc_fmn/overview).

Beardsley, Paul, Gibson, Phil, Hamerlinck, Gabriela, Highlander, Hannah, Jenkins, Kristin, Mead, Louise, (2017), "Professional Development for Undergraduate Educators: Scientific Thinking with Models and Data", Evolution 2017, : Portland, Oregon, June, . Cited by:
Jenkins, Kristin, Hamerlinck, Gabriela, Donovan, Sam, Diaz-Eaton, Carrie, LaMar, Drew, Wojdak, Jeremy, Fleming-Davies, Arietta, Orndorf, Hayley, (2017), "QUBES: Building a community to promote undergraduate quantitative biology education", Gordon Research Conference on Undergraduate Biology Education Research, : Easton, Massachusetts, July, (DOI: 10.25334/Q44T0V). Cited by:
Hamerlinck, Gabriela, Donovan, Sam, Diaz-Eaton, Carrie, Jenkins, Kristin, LaMar, Drew, Wojdak, Jeremy, Fleming-Davies, Arietta, Orndorf, Hayley, (2017), "QUBES: Building a community to promote undergraduate quantitative biology education", Evolution 2017, : Portland, Oregon, June, (DOI: 10.25334/Q44T0V). Cited by:
Fleming-Davies, Arietta, Wojdak, Jeremy, Jenkins, Kristin, Hamerlinck, Gaby, (2016), "In-person Math Attitudes and Anxiety workshop at NABT", National Association of Biology Teachers Annual Conference 2016, : Denver, Colorado, November, . Cited by:
Jenkins, Kristin, (2016), "Teaching Computation in the Sciences Using MATLAB", : Northfield, Minnesota, October, . Cited by:

Co-organizer

Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2016), "Interdisciplinary Modeling Competition", COMAP, : . Cited by:

Judge for the competition

Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2016), "Topics and Issues in Mathematical Biology Education", Annual Meeting of the Society for Mathematical Biology, : Nottingham, UK, July, . Cited by:

Minisymposium Co-organizer

Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2016), "Frameworks for Teaching Mathematical Modeling to Biologists", Joint Meeting of the Education Section of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics and Mathematics of Planet Earth, : Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October, . Cited by:

Invited Session C-organizer

Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2016), "Approaches to Teaching Mathematical Modeling", International Symposium of Biomathematics and Ecology Education and Research, : Charleston, South Carolina, October, . Cited by:

Invited Session Co-organizer

Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2017), "Careers in Environmental biology", : . Cited by:

Steering Committee member on NSF RCN-UBE grant submitted 2017, Lead PI Teresa Mourad, Ecological Society of America.

Diaz Eaton, Carrie, LaMar, Drew, (2017), "Modeling Hub", : . Cited by:

Steering Committee for a joint project of SIAM, MAA, NCTM, and COMAP

Fleming-Davies, Arietta, (2017), "4th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference ", : . Cited by:

Planning Committee

Wojdak, Jeremy, (2017), "QUBES Faculty Mentoring Fellows Program", Online, : Online, March, . Cited by:
Monfils, Anna, Phillips, Molly, Linton, Debra, Donovan, Sam, Hale, Alison, (2017), "Resources for Collections-Based Undergraduate Education Faculty Mentoring Network", Online, : Online, April, . Cited by:
Hanselman, Jennifer, Holmberg, Tara, Steinweg, Meg, Hamerlinck, Gaby, (2017), "InTeGrate 2017 Faculty Mentoring Network", Online, : Online, January, . Cited by:
Fleming-Davies, Arietta, Grayson, Kristine, Bonner, Kaitlin, (2017), "DIG into Data Faculty Mentoring Network", Online, : Online, January, . Cited by:
Hamerlinck, Gaby, Fleming-Davies, Arietta, Jenkins, Kristin, Mourad, Teresa, (2017), "ESA Data Discovery Faculty Mentoring Network", Online, : Online, January, . Cited by:
Amagai, Satoshi, Csikari, Melissa, Hamerlinck, Gaby, (2016), "HHMI Biointeractive Faculty Mentoring Network", Online, : Online, June, . Cited by:
Fleming-Davies, Arietta, Wojdak, Jeremy, Hale, Alison, Jenkins, Kristin, (2016), "Math Attitudes and Anxiety Faculty Mentoring Network", Online, : Online, September, . Cited by:
Donovan, Sam, Jenkins, Kristin, Hale, Alison, Meir, Eli, Roach, John, (2016), "SimBio Faculty Mentoring Network", Online, : Online, July, . Cited by:
Orndorf, Hayley, Pauley, Mark, Ryder, Elizabeth, Sierk, Michael, Wright, Robin, Rosenwald, Anne, Dinsdale, Elizabeth, Triplett, Eric W., Donovan, Sam, Morgan, William, (2017), "Incubators: A community based model for improving the usability of bioinformatics learning resources", Gordon Research Conference on Undergraduate Biology Education Research, : Easton, Massachusetts, July, . Cited by:

The Network for Integrating Bioinformatics into Life Sciences Education (NIBLSE) is an NSF funded Research Coordination Network that aims to establish bioinformatics as an essential component of undergraduate life sciences education. As part of that effort, the project is working to make existing bioinformatics learning resources more accessible to non-specialists and increase their use across undergraduate biology courses. To this end, NIBLSE has partnered with the Quantitative Undergraduate Biology Education and Synthesis (QUBES) project and CourseSource to develop and implement a novel model for supporting the refinement, publication, and dissemination of high quality bioinformatics teaching resources.

Dinsdale, Elizabeth, Pauley, Mark, Rosenwald, Anne, Triplett, Eric W., Morgan, William, (2017), "NIBLSE: A network to fully integrate bioinformatics into undergraduate life science education", Great Lakes Bioinformatics Conference, : Chicago, Illinois, May, . Cited by:

Despite its increasing importance in nearly all areas of biology, bioinformatics has yet to be fully integrated into undergraduate life science curricula. To this end, the Network for Integrating Bioinformatics into Life Sciences Education (NIBLSE, pronounced “nibbles”) was formed and funded by the NSF to: 1) create a network of investigators committed to integrating bioinformatics into undergraduate life sciences education; 2) develop and disseminate a set of core bioinformatics competencies for undergraduate students in the biological sciences; 3) identify and disseminate assessment tools that are aligned with the core competencies; and 4) organize and vet curricular activities and professional development materials that address the competencies. This presentation will present our current progress on these objectives. Foremost, the growing NIBLSE community of biology and bioinformatics educators has recently defined a set of bioinformatics core competencies essential for all life scientists. In addition, NIBLSE, in cooperation with QUBES, has developed an online platform to develop and disseminate bioinformatics learning resources (https://qubeshub.org/groups/niblse). Finally, NIBLSE will soon begin efforts to identify assessment tools for biology instructors incorporating bioinformatics into their classrooms.

Morgan, William, (2017), "The NIBLSE Network", Fifth Biannual Undergraduate Bioinformatics Education Conference Program, : Latrobe, Pennsylvania, April, . Cited by:
Jenkins, Kristin, Donovan, Sam, LaMar, Drew, Hamerlinck, Gabriela, Orndorf, Hayley, (2017), "Making the Most of Models", National Association of Biology Teachers 2017 Annual Conference, : St. Louis, MO, November, . Cited by:
Donovan, Sam, Hale, Alison, Monfils, Anna, Orndorf, Hayley, (2017), "Designing undergraduate biology curricula to teach skills and knowledge for data-intensive environmental research", ESA 2017 Annual Meeting, : Portland, OR, August, (DOI: 10.25334/Q4HW9C). Cited by:
Jenkins, Kristin, (2016), "Modeling for Understanding: An authentic scientific experience in the undergraduate biology classroom", Biology Department Seminar Series, : Georgetown, Washington, DC, September, . Cited by:

Models are an integral part of the scientific process used to represent ideas, solve problems, predict outcomes, and test theories. Modeling involves a broad set of skills and approaches, including quantitative reasoning. Students are exposed to models throughout their education, but may not understand the role of modeling in the scientific process or how to use models to increase their content knowledge. The Quantitative Undergraduate Biology Education (QUBES) project has been supporting a working group exploring how this key scientific practice be more effectively used in undergraduate biology education.

Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2017), "Lost in translation: Academic work beyond academia", : March, . Cited by:
Donovan, Sam, (2017), "QUBES – A virtual synthesis center catalyzing change in undergraduate quantitative biology education", HHMI Constellation Meeting: Advancing science students mastery of quantitative skills, : Chevy Chase, MD, March, . Cited by:
Orndorf, Hayley, Morgan, William, Grandgenett, Neal, Pauley, Mark, Ryder, Liz, Sierk, Michael, Wright, Robin, Rosenwald, Anne, Dinsdale, Elizabeth, Triplett, Eric W, Donovan, Sam, (2017), "Incubators: A community based model for improving the usability of bioinformatics learning resources", Great Lakes Bioinformatics Conference, : Chicago, Illinois, May, . Cited by:

There are a variety of barriers to faculty participation in scholarly approaches to teaching. Primary among these are the challenges undergraduate faculty face in finding and participating in a scholarly community, and in receiving academic credit for their work. The Open Education Resources (OER) movement was designed in part to make it easier for faculty to share their work, particularly in the context of adopting and adapting existing resources. However, participation in the OER community by undergraduate biology faculty is hampered by a lack of awareness, lack of an active disciplinary community, and technical difficulties involved in sharing modified materials. Furthermore, recognition for this type of teaching scholarship is undermined by the lack of clear and consistent ways to document participants' intellectual contributions. We have designed a system for facilitating collaborative projects around existing learning resources that both improve the quality of the materials and also document participant contributions. Incubators are small, peer-driven, relatively short-lived, online communities that work with a learning resource to 1) move it toward publication, 2) improve its usability, and 3) provide customizations for different student audiences and teaching settings. Incubators are formed around specifically identified goals in one or more of these areas. Incubator participants work in an online environment with both editorial and technical facilitators to produce materials that will be shared publicly, with the ultimate goal of publication in an open-access journal. This work is a collaboration between the NSF- funded Network for Integrating Bioinformatics into Life Sciences Education (NIBLSE) and the Quantitative Undergraduate Biology Education & Synthesis (QUBES) projects. The NIBLSE community brings both bioinformatics teaching expertise and learning resources to the Incubators. The QUBES community provides online infrastructure and experience in facilitating online collaboration and publication. Please visit https://qubeshub.org/groups/niblse/resourcecollection for more information.

Fleming-Davies, Arietta, Hamerlinck, Gabriela, Hale, Alison N, Langen, Tom, Mourad, Teresa, Jenkins, Kristin, Donovan, Sam, (2017), "Confronting the challenges of bringing research data into undergraduate classrooms using online faculty mentoring networks", Multi-Scale Evaluation in STEM Education, : Knoxville, Tennessee, February, . Cited by:

Using ecological research data in undergraduate courses has many potential benefits for student learning. Students gain knowledge of ecological concepts, increased understanding of the scientific process, and meaningful opportunities to develop and practice quantitative skills (Langen et al. 2014). As ecological datasets continue to become larger and more complex, faculty may need additional support both to build their own skills and to teach effectively with research data. 

Hamerlinck, Gabriela, (2017), "Infusing quantitative skills into the biology classroom", 4th Life Discovery - Doing Science Education Conference, : Norman, Oklahoma, October, . Cited by:

Increasing quantitative reasoning skills of biology students is necessary, but can be difficult. Participants will explore resources to introduce students to quantitative skills. We will discuss how these skills and resources might be implemented to support biological understanding.

LaMar, M. Drew, Donovan, Sam, Diaz-Eaton, Carrie, Fleming-Davies, Arietta, Gower, Stith, Hale, Alison N., Hamerlinck, Gabriela, Jenkins, Kristin, Poli, DororthyBelle, Sheehy, Bob, Wojdak, Jeremy, (2016), "QUBES: Building a community to promote undergraduate quantitative biology education", The 11th Gateway Computing Environments Conference, : San Diego, California, November, . Cited by:

Quantitative skills have been recognized as core competencies for career success in biology, and many faculty are interested in teaching more quantitative biology in their courses. The QUBES project is designed to improve communication among educators, assist faculty in understanding and implementing novel content and teaching strategies in their unique classroom settings, and create an academic reward system that emphasizes teaching as well as research. To meet these goals, QUBES is building a diverse online community of educators interested in quantitative biology.

Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2016), "Biocalculus: Is it better?", Joint meeting for the Society of Mathematical Biology and The European Conference of Mathematical and Theoretical Biology, Nottingham, UK: July, . Cited by:
Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2016), "A framework for modeling to encourage interdisciplinary conversations", Joint Meeting of the Education Section of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics and Mathematics of Planet Earth, Philadelphia, PA: October, . Cited by:
Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2016), "A framework for the teaching of modeling for biologists", International Symposium of Biomathematics and Ecology Education and Research, Charleston, SC: October, . Cited by:
Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2016), "“QUBES: Quantitative Undergraduate Biology Education and Synthesis", International Congress on Mathematical Education, Hamburg, Germany: July, . Cited by:
Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2016), "Community Building", International Symposium of Biomathematics and Ecology Education and Research, Charleston, SC: October, . Cited by:
Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2016), "Yes, I model", Marymount University, Department of Mathematics Invited Presentation, Arlington, VA: October, . Cited by:
Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2016), "Ecology, Evolution and Mathematics: A co-evolutionary model of mutualism", Colloquium of the School of Biology and Ecology at the University of Maine, Orono, ME: November, . Cited by:
Diaz Eaton, Carrie, (2016), "A community-centered approach to STEM education", STEM Education Colloquia, La Jolla, CA: December, . Cited by:
Grayson, Kristine, Donovan, Sam, Bonner, Kaitlin, Fleming-Davies, Arietta, Hale, Alison, Wu, Ben, (2017), "Bringing Research Data to the Ecology Classroom: Opportunities, Barriers, and Next Steps", Ecological Society of America Annual Conference 2017, Portland, OR: August, . Cited by:

The broad vision for transforming undergraduate biology education includes promoting scientific literacy in the "New Biology" (NRC, 2009), where the development of quantitative competencies is central to understanding the process of science (AAAS, 2011). Instruction that incorporates student-driven inquiry using authentic data can emphasize quantitative skills and contextualize core ecological concepts using real-world questions. A great deal of progress has been made in the collection, sharing, and discoverability of biological research data as a public resource. Access to data is no longer the primary factor limiting its use in undergraduate classrooms and great strides have been made in the best practices for teaching with data. The first goal of this session is to highlight current knowledge on effective strategies for bringing authentic research data into introductory biology and ecology classrooms through describing several cutting-edge practices and curriculum resources. The Ecological Society of America has been recognized as a leader in transforming undergraduate biology (AAAS, 2001) and they continue to play an important coordinating role in emerging efforts to bring more data into classrooms. The speakers include pioneers in these efforts who have worked closely with professional societies, data providers, and educational specialists to demonstrate the efficacy of using data in diverse educational settings. The second goal of this session is to provide a forum to discuss challenges facing development, dissemination, and broad implementation of data-centric curricula. Using ecological data in the classroom presents unique challenges, as ecological processes are often scale-dependent and complex to interpret. Successful execution of data-driven student inquiry requires the correct balance of exploration and self-discovery with tangible outcomes that reinforce core concepts. The speakers will address perceived barriers to using data in the classroom and how new approaches can promote student learning and increase the reach of resources for teaching. The successful integration of data exploration into the classroom has the potential to play a major role in the quest for quantitative literacy in undergraduate students. Because we are in the midst of a rapid evolution of both our science and our science education, it is important that we critically examine the development and use of data-driven teaching resources. In this session, leading thinkers in ecology and biology education will provide a conceptual framework for addressing barriers to classroom use and identifying paths toward the continued expansion of authentic data in ecology classrooms.

Mourad, Teresa, (2016), "2016 ESA Education Scholars", : October, . Cited by:
Donovan, Sam, (2016), "Reimagining professional development: Faculty mentoring networks as a model for connecting projects and teachers", iDigBio Education and Outreach Webinar Series, : December, . Cited by:

The Quantitative Undergraduate Biology Education and Synthesis (QUBES) project is working to design, implement, and assess online collaborative communities that promote teaching scholarship. In doing this we have learned a variety of strategies for connecting existing and emerging projecst with interested faculty to promote work that serves the needs of all participants. The webinar will provide some background on the QUBES project, examples of how faculty mentoring networks have made it possible for diverse educational programs to reach new audiences, and a framework for designing your own broader impact strategies.

Hamerlinck, Gaby, Jenkins, Kristin, (2016), "Bringing Real Ecological Data into the Classroom: DryadLab on QUBESHub", ACUBE Annual Meeting, Milwaukee, WI: October, . Cited by:
Fleming-Davies, Arietta, Hamerlinck, Gabriela, Hale, Alison N, Langen, Tom, Mourad, Teresa, Jenkins, Kristin, Donovan, Sam, (2016), "Confronting the challenges of bringing research data into undergraduate classrooms using online faculty mentoring networks", ACUBE Annual Meeting, : Milwaukee, WI, October, . Cited by:

Using ecological research data in undergraduate courses has many potential benefits for student learning. Students gain knowledge of ecological concepts, increased understanding of the scientific process, and meaningful opportunities to develop and practice quantitative skills (Langen et al. 2014). As ecological datasets continue to become larger and more complex, faculty may need additional support both to build their own skills and to teach effectively with research data.

Diaz Eaton, Carrie, Allen, Deborah, Anderson, Laurel J., Bowser, Gillian, Pauley, Mark A., Williams, Kathy S., Uno, Gordon E., (2016), "Summit of the Research Coordination Networks for Undergraduate Biology Education", CBE Life Sciences Education, 15, 4: December, . Cited by:

The first summit of projects funded by the National Science Foundation’s Research Coordination Networks for Undergraduate Biology Education (RCN-UBE) program was held January 14–16, 2016, in Washington, DC. Sixty-five scientists and science educators from 38 of the 41 Incubator and Full RCN-UBE awards discussed the value and contributions of RCNs to the national biology education reform effort. The summit illustrated the progress of this innovative UBE track, first awarded in 2009. Participants shared experiences regarding network development and growth, identified best practices and challenges faced in network management, and discussed work accomplished. We report here on key aspects of network evaluation, characteristics of successful networks, and how to sustain and broaden participation in networks. Evidence from successful networks indicates that 5 years (the length of a Full RCN-UBE) may be insufficient time to produce a cohesive and effective network. While online communication promotes the activities of a network and disseminates effective practices, face-to-face meetings are critical for establishing ties between network participants. Creation of these National Science Foundation–funded networks may be particularly useful for consortia of faculty working to address problems or exchange novel solutions discovered while introducing active-learning methods and/or course-based research into their curricula.

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