The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) brings together the science of the natural world with the science of human behavior and decision-making to find solutions to complex environmental problems. We convene science teams to work on broad issues of national and international relevance, such as water resources management, land management, agriculture, species protection, among other areas of study. By supporting interdisciplinary science teams and researchers with diverse skills, data, and perspectives, SESYNC seeks to lead in-depth research and scholarship that will inform decisions and accelerate scientific discovery. SESYNC is funded by an award to the University of Maryland from the National Science Foundation. Learn more about SESYNC.

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Participants of the QUBES-SESYNC FMN gathered at SESYNC for the FMN Kick-off meeting

 

QUBES-SESYNC Faculty Mentoring Network: Investigating Socio-Environmental Issues with Data 

Spring 2018

The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) and QUBES worked with 14 faculty participants who are interested in adapting and implementing existing interdisciplinary curriculum modules that focus on socio-environmental issues. The educational modules highlighted in this FMN were selected from several online collections from National organizations including SESYNC, InTeGrate, Network of Conservation Educators and Practitioners (NCEP), and the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network

News

European Union Award

SESYNC affiliate scholar and postdoc alumnus Jampel Dell’Angelo and colleague win prestigious 4M Euro award to advance water governance 

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Introducing New Communications Toolkit

 

Introducing a toolkit for communicating your SESYNC research. This toolkit guides synthesis teams on how to communicate research to a variety of audiences.

We recognize that, along with actionable science, synthesis research exists along a spectrum: from advancing an academic idea to informing decision makers and changing behavior.

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