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  • Organization
    Davenport University

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  • Biography

    I have  a B.S. in biology, an M.A. in Health Promotion & Program Management, an M.S. in Conservation Biology, and  a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership.  I have research interests in both ecology and science education. While obtaining my master’s degree in conservation biology, I conducted ecological research which involved the study of winter bird-feeder use of the White-breasted Nuthatch and dominance hierarchy in Black-capped Chickadees. I also studied the nesting and reproductive behavior of Eastern Bluebirds, House Wrens, and Tree Swallows during her two and a half years working for Michigan State University as a wildlife technician and research assistant on the Tittabawassee River Ecological Risk Assessment.

    My current science education research in both the SOTL and TAR formats focuses on implementation of various learning modalities such as case-based, biological modeling, incorporation of authentic research experience, and the genetic literacy of undergraduate students. Another research interest that I have involves the social justice aspects of science education related to women and underrepresented populations in STEM fields. I am also is a Higher Education Ambassador for HHMI BioInteractive (2017-present) and a steering committee member for the Association of College and University Biology Educators (ACUBE).
    I am broadly interested in behavioral ecology and animal behavior, especially avian (bird) behavior. Past research projects have included winter bird-feeder use of the White-breasted Nuthatch and dominance hierarchy in Black-capped Chickadees, as well as nesting and reproductive behavior of Eastern Bluebirds, House Wrens, and Tree Swallows. Currently my focus for animal behavior involves using ethograms and time budget studies as a modality for teaching the nature of science and scientific inquiry to biology majors. An emphasis on discovery science is an excellent way to teach budding scientists observational skills, as well as simple data organization and analysis. Other behavioral projects for both course-based research and independent undergraduate student projects are currently in development.


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