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How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school

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Bransford, J., Brown, A., & Cocking, R. (Eds.). (1999). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school. Washington, DC: National Research Council. Backward Design for Forward Action.

A description of some key areas that are relevant to a deeper understanding of a student's learning experience: learning as an active process, adaptive experience of learning, learning for understanding, and role of prior knowledge. A summary of research findings on the physiological and cultural influences on student learning is described.

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Sample DEI Statement by Derek Braun

This sample DEI Statement is written by Derek Braun, Professor at Gallaudet University and BioGraphI Steering Committee member. He includes this statement in his syllabi.

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Sample DEI Statements (The Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning, Brown University)

This resource from Brown University's Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning begins with guiding questions to ask yourself before crafting a DEI statement. Sample statements follow the questions.

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Creating an inclusive syllabus

This resource from the Center for Teaching Excellence at University of Kansas is a useful tool for creating an inclusive syllabus. It includes a sample DEI statement near the end of the page.

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Knowing your own: A classroom case study using the scientific method to investigate how birds learn to recognize their offspring

A useful in-class activity to learn about the scientific method and predictive data visualization

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Charles Willis onto BIOL 1001 Lessons

Samples of diversity statements and how to write them

This website also includes background information on the beneficial reasons for including diversity statements in our syllabi.

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Samples of diversity and inclusion syllabus statements

This set of samples was compiled by Clemson's Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation.

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Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Statement of the RCN for Evolution in Changing Seas

This example is from a network of marine biologists.

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UC San Diego Principles of Community

This example from UC San Diego is intended to apply to all groups of people in all positions at the institution. You can use your institution's statement as a starting point for your own, describing how your commitments and actions contribute to or build upon that of your institution.

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Professional Development Opportunities in Mindfulness and Equity

Here are some professional development opportunities I have found. Feel free to add more! 

Neurodecolonization and Indigenous Mindfulness is a project by Michael Yellow Bird, PhD from the University of Manitoba 

White Awake waking ourselves up for the benefit of all (for white identifying folx)

Mindfulness for the People Radically Reimagining the Mindfulness Movement was inspired by our dream to center Black and Brown folx in all things mindfulness research, teaching, practice, and tech. 

Academics for Black Survival and Wellness and Wells Healing  https://wellshealing.podia.com/ is a personal and professional development initiative for Non-Black academics to honor the toll of racial trauma on Black people, resist anti-Blackness and white supremacy, and facilitate accountability and collective action. A4BL also is a space for healing and wellness for Black people.

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National Park Service: The Discomfort Zone

Are you comfortable? If yes, then you’re not learning. According to Farrah Storr, the speaker of this TED Talk and author who wrote “The Discomfort Zone: How to Get What You Want by Living Fearlessly,” you only find personal greatness by stepping out of your comfort zone.

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Empowering Education: Trauma-Informed Mindfulness

Intended for a K-12 audience but concepts can be adapted for any learning community. 

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Willow Wellness: The Appropriation of Mindfulness

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Greater Good Magazine (Berkeley): What is Mindfulness

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Mindful Teachers: Tips for Including Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in Mindfulness, Meditation, and Yoga Classes

Intended for a K-12 audience but concepts can be adapted for any audience of learners. 

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Mindful Communications: Using Mindfulness to Break Racial Bias

Open initially but then has popped behind a subscription/paywall. 

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Northeastern University: 4 Practices to Promote Equity in the Classroom

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The Inner Work of Racial Justice: Healing Ourselves and Transforming Our Communities Through Mindfullness

Law professor and mindfulness practitioner Rhonda Magee shows that the work of racial justice begins with ourselves. This is a link to where you can purchase this book. 

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University of Minnesota: Mindfulness for Racial Justice

This article arose from a conversation with Rhonda Magee, a law professor and mindfulness teacher and the author of The Inner Work of Racial Justice: Healing Ourselves and Transforming Our Communities through Mindfulness. Magee writes about the importance of mindfulness for people of all and various racialized identities working toward racial justice. This article is written from our understanding as white-embodied, cisgender women, and includes reflections from Rhonda, a Black-embodied, cisgender woman. It may be especially helpful for white-embodied readers who are interested in understanding how mindfulness-based practices might assist them in addressing systemic racism, or, for people of color exploring ways of working with white-embodied people through mindfulness. We encourage all readers to check out Magee's writings to see how her work resonates for you.

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Learning for Justice: Mindful of Equity

Practices that help students control their impulses can also mask systemic failures. Written for a K-12 audience however I think this resource translates well to higher education as well. 

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Fullerton College: Mindfulness and Equity: Natural Partners

Slides from the FC Mindful Growth Initiative. Mindful Growth = Mindfulness + Growth Mindset 

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Elements of Indigenous Style: 12 Ways to Better Choose Our Words When We Write About Indigenous Peoples

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Molly Phillips onto Land Acknowledgement Resources

Mindful Connections: Bringing Deeper Awareness to Your Land Acknowledgement

Mindfulness teacher Rose Mina Munjee explores why Indigenous land acknowledgments matter, and offers a guide for writing a land acknowledgment as a practice to expand awareness and encourage justice.

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Northwestern Native American and Indigenous Initiatives: Land Acknowledgement Resources

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Example of a mindful land acknowledgment from the Centre for Teaching and Learning at Queen’s University.

Lindsay Brant, Educational Developer, Indigenous Pedagogies and Ways of Knowing at the Centre for Teaching and Learning, talks about meaningful land acknowledgements.

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