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The “Global Temperature Change in the 21st Century” was used in the majors introductory non-lab biology course. The purpose of this course was to introduce potential biology majors to the process of science and to understand that all the science information they read in their textbooks comes from people doing work and analyzing information. The class met for 90 minutes twice a week. I used the module near the beginning of the semester, week 4, and it was their first experience using Excel in my course. The module took two 90 minute class periods and I included a take-home summative assignment at the end.

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Instructor notes from an introductory biology course

This module was used in the majors introductory non-lab biology course at the end of the semester as a culminating experience to track their Excel and data interpretation skills. The purpose of this course is to introduce potential biology majors to the process of science and to understand that all the science information they read in their textbooks comes from people doing work and analyzing information. The class meets for 90 minutes twice a week. The module was done in class with class discussions of the results interspersed throughout the module. 

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Adaptation to: Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America

I used this module for group work in an introductory Biology course for majors that ran for 7 weeks and had no laboratory component. In this posting I have included Instructor Notes that describe how I modified and supplemented the module to create 6 assignments that students worked on in a group of 4-5 students. In addition, I’ve added assignment instructions and rubrics that are supplemental to the module.

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Supplemental Instruction Handout Noel Resources

I launched a Supplemental Instruction session using modified resources in March 2016. Everything seemed to go smoothly, aside from our computers all deciding to randomly shut down and install updates halfway through the activity. Honestly, some computers did appear to work and students seemed to complete the activity. The way I have it all streamlined should have helped these non-major students. I have three master Excel files (these sheets are not locked) and can be manipulated. The three city Excel files have the first two sheets locked/protected to minimize students accidentally erasing data. Please let me know if you have any questions as the last file is the word document each group of students had in front of them to turn in. Hopefully you find it useful if you choose to use pieces of this.

Brandon

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EREN PFPP Complete Protocol

This pdf file contains all of the Protocols for PFPP. The datasheets and all of the appendices need to be downloaded separately.

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Gabriela Hamerlinck onto Permanent Forest Plot Project

Quadratic Regression

This is a PowerPoint presentation that I put together to get our freshman Biological Diversity Lab (4 hours) students up to speed for the bald eagle lab.  It covers how to determine which models and variables are statistically significant as well as quadratic regression.  This is a 30 minute presentation to be used in the 1 hour of lecture and 3 hours of lab (4 hours total) course that a biologist and I (mathematician) co-taught.  We have about 15 students in each of two lab sections.  Feel free to modify in any way to suit your needs.    

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Linear Regression PowerPoint Presentation

This is a PowerPoint presentation that I put together to get our freshman Biological Diversity Lab students up to speed for the phenology lab.  It includes an introduction to graphing, rates of change, total change, lines, and simple linear regression.  This is a 30 minute presentation to be used in the 1 hour of lecture and 3 hours of lab (4 hours total) course that a biologist and I (mathematician) co-taught.  We have about 15 students in each of two lab sections.  Feel free to modify in any way to suit your needs.    

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Favorites

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Erich Huebner onto new collection

To P or not to P?

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Drew LaMar onto Timeline

Multiple explanatory variables (cont'd)

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Drew LaMar onto Timeline

Example Post

This is an example post. In this description I could include the following:

“This is a modified activity from the TIEE materials. I had my students use data from Wisconsin to ask their own questions about phenology that was turned in as a lab report (rubric included). This was in a 3-hour lab of 30 senior level undergraduates. I also had my students read the information on this website as a pre-lab exercise (www.qubeshub.org/groups/esa)”

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Chapter 18: Multiple explanatory variables (cont'd)

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Drew LaMar onto Timeline

Data Processing with dplyr & tidyr, by Brad Boehmke

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Drew LaMar onto Data Manipulation

Mixed-effects models for repeated-measures ANOVA

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Drew LaMar onto Statistics and Data Analysis

Handbook of Biological Statistics

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Drew LaMar onto Statistics and Data Analysis

Statistical Mistakes in Research: Use and misuse of statistics in biology

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Drew LaMar onto Statistics and Data Analysis

Chapter 18: Multiple explanatory variables

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Drew LaMar onto Timeline

Chapter 18: Multiple explanatory variables

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Chapter 17: Regression (cont'd)

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Drew LaMar onto Timeline

Building Successful Online Communities: Evidence-Based Social Design

Overview from the publishers web site. 

Online communities are among the most popular destinations on the Internet, but not all online communities are equally successful. For every flourishing Facebook, there is a moribund Friendster—not to mention the scores of smaller social networking sites that never attracted enough members to be viable. This book offers lessons from theory and empirical research in the social sciences that can help improve the design of online communities.

The authors draw on the literature in psychology, economics, and other social sciences, as well as their own research, translating general findings into useful design claims. They explain, for example, how to encourage information contributions based on the theory of public goods, and how to build members’ commitment based on theories of interpersonal bond formation. For each design claim, they offer supporting evidence from theory, experiments, or observational studies.

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Sam S Donovan onto Online Community Support Resources

Chapter 17: Regression

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Drew LaMar onto Timeline

Chapter 17: Regression

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Drew LaMar onto Resources for Whitlock & Schluter book

Chapter 16: Correlation between numerical variables

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Drew LaMar onto Resources for Whitlock & Schluter book