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SIMIODE EXPO 2022

Download the EXPO 2022 flyer.

Printable Conference Schedule.

Please see the main SIMIODE EXPO 2022 page to see a schedule overview, registration information, and the call for abstracts and session proposals.

Conference Video and Reference Guide to see How Our Conference Works

Day 1: 10 February 2022 (Eastern US Time)

Rooms for events are denoted Rxy for Room Rx, x =1,2,3, . . . and y for part of session y = A is first part and y = B is for second part.

Day 1 - 1:00 PM–1:30 PM: Opening Ceremony and Greeting

Introductions, SOCOCO Platform Orientation, Social Planning, Notions (Slides) (Video)

Day 1 - 1:30 PM–2:15 PM: Workshops (W) and Modeling Experiences (E)

Simultaneous sessions have two 20 minute Experiences with a 5 minute break in between OR one 45 minute Workshop. Experience modeling and learn how to use it in teaching.

  • (W) m&m Death and Immigration and Variation
    (R1) Dina Yagodich, Frederick Community College, Frederick MD USA and Cheryl Potocki, Charter School of Wilmington, Wilmington DE USAAnswering the Question "Why Diff Eq on Day 1 with m&ms?" (Slides-Yagodich) (Slides-Potocki) (Video)

    Abstract: Starting off the year with a modeling activity is a good hook to capture the students’ interest as well as remind students of the importance of the application of the mathematics we teach. So often the student mathematics experience consists of learning mathematics to learn more mathematics rather than experiencing the use and joy of a mathematics topic unto itself. Preferring to review previous material (particularly in our covid teaching world) as we go through the course rather than spend a block of time up front reviewing, the iconic SIMIODE m&m activity is a good starting point for the differential equations unit in BC Calculus building on material learned in the AB course. It also starts the process of exploring different population models leading to logistic function models also included in BC. In a differential equations course, the m&m activity also is an easy transition into the technique of integrating factors to solve first order differential equations.

    Using the m&m Death and Immigration scenario from SIMIODE, instructors can turn the first day of class from an hour of writing down new vocabulary to students experiencing what terms like family of curves, steady-state solutions, and initial conditions really mean. Using a software package like MATLAB or Excel, student data can be plotted to show, often for the first time in a mathematics class, important topics like error and discrete versus continuous systems.

    Come join us and get the good vibes on this great introductory activity for students (and faculty!)

  • (W) Modeling a Falling Column of Water — Torricelli's Law
    (R2) Brian Winkel, SIMIODE, Chardon OH USA Soup to Nuts Modeling a Falling Column of Water (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: We present a Modeling Scenario from SIMIODE on modeling a falling column of water, initially with an empirical fitting model and then with a physical principle-base model and compare it to participant data collected from SIMIODE YouTube Channel for Data Collection.

  • (W) Group data collection leads to warfare modeling
    (R3) Kyle Allaire, Worcester State University, Worcester MA USA, Lisa Naples, Macalester College, Saint Paul MN USA, Justin Trulen, Kentucky Wesleyan College, Owensboro KY USA, Li Zhang, The Citadel, Charleston SC USASimulation and Modeling Warfare in a Differential Equations Class (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: In this talk we invite the audience to participate in a brief demonstration of SIMIODE Modeling Scenario 5-077 m&m Attrition Warfare We will collect data and then construct, analyze, and solve a system of two equations that depict Lanchester's N-squared Law. We conclude with a discussion of our experiences adapting and implementing this modeling activity in our classrooms during the Fall 2021 semester. This talk is a follow-up from the SIMIODE NSF MINDE Workshop held in June 2021.

  • (W) Modeling Epidemic with Skittles
    (R4) Tim Antonelli, Worcester State University, Worcester MA USA, Tova Brown, Mathematics, Wisconsin Luthern College, Milwaukee WI USA, Marco Lopez, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará BRAZIL, Tingxiu Wang, Mathematics, Texas A&M University, Commerce TX USA, A Hands-On Activity for Simulating an Epidemic with Skittles (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: SIMIODE scenario 6-1-Epidemic by Sheila Miller models a 1978 influenza outbreak at a boarding school in England using both discrete-time and continuous-time susceptible-infectious-recovered (SIR) models. We present a hands-on activity to accompany this module in which students simulate their own outbreaks and compare their results to predictions. We first derive the SIR model from first principles, then demonstrate the hands-on activity using Skittles. Finally, we show how students can estimate model parameters from their data and evaluate goodness of fit.

Day 1 - 2:15 PM–3:15 PM: National Science Foundation Time

  • *** MOVED TO FRIDAY R4 4:00 - 4:45 PM *** National Science Foundation Opportunities
    (R1) Presenter Michael Ferrara, Program Director, Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE), Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR), National Science Foundation, Alexandria VA USA Funding Opportunities in the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education (Slides)

    Abstract: The Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) at the National Science Foundation offers a variety of grant programs that promote innovations in learning and teaching and/or infrastructural support in the mathematical sciences. In this presentation, we will give an overview of several current programs with upcoming deadlines and discuss features of successful proposals. The remainder of the session will be reserved for Q&A and a discussion on proposal preparation, NSF policies, and other topics of interest to attendees.

Day 1 - 3:15 PM–4:00 PM: Keynote Speaker

  • (M) Deborah Hughes Hallett, Mathematics, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ USA and Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge MA USA Data Driven: Differential Equations at the Frontier (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: The world is changing! Over the last year, pandemics, economic downturns, social justice, have all made their mark. Never has data been more important, nor the need for projections more urgent, than now. How is mathematics responding? This talk will suggest that faculty teaching differential equations are well positioned to lead a successful curriculum revitalization. Despite recent changes in pedagogy, there have been no recent major curricula reforms. For example, shouldn’t climate change and pandemic predictions be reflected in what we teach? Shouldn’t the mathematics we teach illuminate the mathematics the world is using?

Day 1 - 4:00 PM–5:00 PM: Breakout Time

Engage and converse with others with similar interests in these informal breakout sessions.

  • (R1) Moderator Deborah Hughes Hallett, Mathematics and Public Policy, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ USA Calculus Reform Shapes Differential Equations Modeling and Data Use

    Abstract: Bring your ideas and your critiques: How should the curriculum be changing? What could we be teaching to benefit students?

Day 1 - 5:00 PM–5:45 PM: Presentations on Role of Technology and Tools in Modeling

Simultaneous sessions have two 20 minute presentations with a 5 minute break in between or a 45 minute session. Explore the role of technology in modeling and how to use it in teaching.

  • Slopes Slippery and Otherwise
    (R1) Tim Lucas, Mathematics, Pepperdine University, Malibu CA USA and Krista Lucas, Biology, Pepperdine University, Malibu CA USA Slopes: A Free, Intuitive Mobile App to Enhance Learning in Differential Equations (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: In a differential equations course it is crucial for mathematics students to engage in active learning along with discussion of the material with their peers. A key for these students to understand mathematical models that incorporate differential equations is visualizing slopefields, phase planes and solutions. Slopes is a mobile application with an intuitive interface that is designed to visualize solutions to differential equations and support active learning in the classroom. Slopes is currently available for iPads, iPhones, and Android phones, which are highly portable and feature larger touch screens that allow students to view and manipulate content easily. To study the possible benefits of the app, we implemented group activities using Slopes into an ordinary differential equations class, conducted observations and focus groups, and examined final poster projects on modeling topics. We found that students used Slopes to visualize solutions, aid in discussion and cooperation, and demonstrate understanding of differential equations concepts. This session will engage participants in group activities that introduce classes of differential equations through mathematical models, provide opportunities for visual exploration, and encourage discussion of the concepts in the context of the models.

  • Python and R Programming in Support of Modeling
    (R2) Boyan Kostadinov, Mathematics, New York City College of Technology, City University of New York, Brooklyn NY USA Creating Dynamic Analysis Documents in RStudio (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: We introduce R Markdown in RStudio as a computational framework for mathematical modeling that supports R and Python for creating dynamic analysis documents, which unify coding and mathematical narrative. This technology can be used to support computational modeling with a wide range of applications, from probability and statistics to computational calculus, linear algebra and differential equations, to modern data science. This framework allows us to create professional project reports, lecture notes, randomizable exams, presentations, and even publication quality papers, blogs and websites. We illustrate this relatively new technology with some modeling projects, which we plan to share on the RStudio Cloud in order to provide some hands-on experience. We will also share 4 additional documents: Introduction to R and R Markdown, as well as our PRIMUS paper dedicated to this topic and its supplement.

Day 1 - 5:45 PM–7:00 PM: Free Time

A break in the program with an opportunity to meet colleagues to discuss areas of interest. The conference platform will be open for self-directed dinner conversations.

Day 1 - 7:00 PM–8:00 PM: Presentations on Modeling and Research Opportunities and Issues

Simultaneous sessions have two 25 minute presentations with a 5 minute break in between.

  • Spillovers - Classroom to Research to Student Growth - I
    (R1A) Maila Brucal Hallare, Mathematics, Norfolk State University, Norfolk VA USA Strengthening the Research-Teaching-Research Nexus: the Undergraduate (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Will conducting research help me become a better mathematics instructor? We investigate this question from the lens of a faculty in an undergraduate institution. Adapting a broadened view of mathematics research that includes creating undergraduate teaching resources that are interesting-to-the-21st-century student, not-in-your-usual-textbook, and classroom-tested-and-refined, the answer to the question is YES! Moreover, the nexus achieves a full circle when our students become involved in undergraduate mathematics research projects themselves, by further investigating and broadening our creations.

  • Spillovers - Classroom to Research to Student Growth - II
    (R1B) Iordanka Panayotova, Mathematics, Christopher Newport University, Newport News VA USA Fostering Student Engagement and Collaboration with Real-life Scenarios in and out of the Classroom (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: The most important task that higher education has is to prepare students for their career paths. But how can we achieve this? One way, if not the only, is to involve students in solving real-life problems that challenge their curiosity and allow them to apply their creativity. In this talk, I will share some of my practices to involve students in independent research projects. Some of these grew into real-life modeling scenarios which were implemented in the classroom and became the foundation for further student engagement in collaborative research projects across disciplines and institutions.

  • Interdisciplinary Collaborations in Teaching and Research
    (R2A) Vinodh Kumar Chellamuthu, Mathematics, Dixie State University Saint George UT USA Increasing Student Ownership and Engagement through Interdisciplinary Collaboration (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Interdisciplinary collaboration provides students with an authentic experience solving a real-world problem from business, industry, or government agencies. The presenter will share benefits, successes, and challenges mentoring student teams on interdisciplinary projects. Participants will see the wide range of industrial projects that students in an undergraduate mathematics class can tackle. Participants will learn how interdisciplinary collaborative projects help students take ownership of a challenging problem, develop skillsets, and prepare for the demanding job market.

  • Collaboration Opportunities with Industry
    (R2B) Eric Stachura, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw GA USA and Tamara Lozano, Yokogawa Corportion of America, Newnan GA USA Chemical and Biomedical Applications of Differential equations (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: We discuss a modeling scenario in which students are led through a classical problem in chemical engineering: to calculate the concentration profile of cyclohexane within a catalyst pellet by solving a second order linear differential equation. We will show how students will analyze the concentration as the radius of the catalyst shrinks to zero. We end by discussing an optional set of questions related to a hydrogel model for knee joint replacements, using similar mathematics. This is work with Tamara Lozano (Yokogawa Corporation of America).

  • Addictive Behaviour Modeling
    (R3A) Hector Mera Couto, Mathematics, Montgomery County Community College, Blue Bell PA USA Harmonic Oscillators and Addictive Behaviour (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: We introduce a happiness threshold in Sprott’s model of drug addiction [J. C. Sprott, Nonlinear Dynamics, Psychology, and Life Sciences, 9, 223 (2005)]. The resulting threshold model is shown to account for escalation, i.e. the increased frequency of self-administration observed in animal models at the onset of addiction. A simple hypergeometric law is hypothesized and put forward to help quantify the increase in drug-intake frequency as a function of time, resulting in two-parameter models that fit experimental data well, thus describing the early stages of addiction in animal models.

  • Modeling Neurodegenerative Disease Misfolded Proteins
    (R3B) Jakob Kotas, Mathematics, Menlo College, Atherton CA USA Using Differential Equations to Model Prion Growth (Slides)

    Abstract: We give an outline of how we use ODEs in my research. We use ODEs to describe and understand the growth of prions, which are misfolded proteins in the brain that lead to neurodegenerative disease. This talk will be at a level appropriate for undergraduates who have completed an introductory ODEs course.

  • Dynamics for Little Schoolers
    (R4A) Kimberly Ayers. California State University, San Marcos CA USA Little School Dynamics: Updates from the Past Year (Video)

    Abstract: In 2021 we established the Little School Dynamics, an online research community sponsored by AIM to bring together dynamics researchers at Primarily Undergraduate Institutions. In the time of COVID, we've found that having a regular online meeting space for researchers to connect has helped people interact and be more productive in their research. In this talk, we'll present on our activities from the past year, and our initiatives going forward.

  • Advanced Computing Concepts Explored
    (R4B) Kamal Nain Chopra, Applied Physics, Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology, GGSIP University, New Delhi INDIA Analytical and Technical Analysis of the Computing Concepts and Applications with Emphasis in Predictive Analytics, Lattice Quantum Chromo Dynamics, and Computational Cosmology (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: The studies related to the Concepts of Advanced Computing have been reviewed and discussed. The applications of Advanced computing in Particle Physics, Networking and Data Handling have been discussed. The facilities required for advanced computing are briefly described. Special emphasis has been placed on the role of Advanced Computing on Science and Engineering. Simulation for Optimization in Predictive Analytics, and also for maximizing the output and profit of the commerce and industry have also been briefly discussed. Design Considerations for Lattice Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) have been discussed, and presented in this paper. The treatment has been based on expressing the strong interaction between quarks mediated by gluons, and considering the space-time lattice to be distributed across all of the nodes. The Lattice QCD (- D meson semileptonic decay amplitudes), as reported in the literature, has been technically discussed. Comparison between Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) and QCD has been briefly brought out. A brief description of the Simulation of large scale structures, cosmic web of dark matter filaments and halos, has also been given. The paper is expected to be useful to the new entrants in the field and also the senior Technology in the scientific fields. For more details see paper

  • Experience and Collaboration on Health Modeling
    (R5A) Anuj Mubayi, Infectious Disease Forecasting Lead, The Public Health Company Center for Collaborative Studies in Mathematical Biology, Illinois State University, Normal IL USA Mathematics, Models, and Medicine: Inferring Learning Lessons from My Experience and Collaborations (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: I consider myself to be an experienced health decision analyst and mathematical modeler, the skills that I acquired over the past decade or so. My interests and thinking closely align with a sentiment of renowned mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss: “Surely it is not knowledge but learning; not owning but earning; not being there but getting there that gives us the greatest pleasure.” With this sentiment in mind, in my talk, I will discuss how I built my professional foundation while learning and applying fascinating mathematical models to the world of medicine and public health challenges. Although, I received a degree in mathematics, my research has focused on the rich and wide variety of applications including ecology, infectious diseases, health economics, and social science. Some of my research has led to a timely evaluation of key healthcare problems, drastically helping to mitigate mortality and morbidity rates. Given the rapidly changing nature of global health knowledge, in my talk, I will also focus on how we train the next generation of data scientists, expert disease modelers, and high-quality communicators to meet the needs of modern-day decision-makers.

Day 1 - 8:00 PM–9:30 PM: Student Poster Session

Day 1 - 9:30 PM–until: Free Time

The conference platform will be open for informal self-directed conversations and Zoom meetings.

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Day 2: 11 February 2022 (Eastern US Time)

Rooms for events are denoted Rxy for Room Rx, x =1,2,3, . . . and y for part of session y = A is first part and y = B is for second part.

Day 2 - 1:00 PM–1:15 PM: Opening Greeting

Introductions, SOCOCO Platform Orientation, Social Planning, Notions

Day 2 - 1:15 PM–2:15 PM: Workshops (W) and Modeling Experiences (E)

Simultaneous sessions have two 25 minute Experiences with a 5 minute break in between OR one 55 minute Workshop. Experience modeling and learn how to use it in teaching.

Engage and converse with others with similar interests in these informal breakout sessions.

  • Career Opportunities in Mathematics at the National Security Agency
    (R1) Sara Waldman, National Security Agency, Fort Meade MD USA National Security Agency Employment Opportunities for Mathematicians (Video)

    Abstract: Mathematics can be more than just a subject in school; it can be a career. The government is the number one single employer of mathematicians in the country. Many of those mathematicians end up at the National Security Agency (NSA), where they find careers in research, cybersecurity, and cryptanalysis. This talk will be an introduction to the roles of mathematicians at NSA, followed by a Q&A session.
    This talk is aimed at US Citizens who are considering employment opportunities – now or in the near future.

  • (W) Two Rich Areas of Modeling Applications for Your Coursework and Research
    (R2) Tahmineh Azizi, Mathematics, Florida State University, Tallahassee FL USA Mathematical Modeling with Applications in Epidemiology and Pharmacology (Slides and Text) (Video)

    Abstract: Mathematical modeling helps us to understand the interaction between the components of biological systems and prediction of the future of them. In this presentation, we focus on application of mathematical modelling in Epidemiology and Pharmacology. The relationship between epidemiology, mathematical modeling and computational tools lets us to build and test theories on the development and fighting against a disease.

    In the first part of this presentation, we study two infectious disease models and we use the nonlinear optimization and optimal control theory which helps to find strategies towards transmission control and to forecast the international spread of the infectious diseases. This study is motivated by the study of epidemiological models applied to infectious diseases in an optimal control perspective. This present work will advance the understanding about the spread of infectious diseases and lead to novel conceptual understanding for spread of them.

    During recent decades in addition to the epidemiological models, Pharmacokinetic models have become central of attention in different disciplines and caused to do a lot of efforts to make them more accurate. Pharmacokinetic models are mathematical models which provide insights into the interaction of chemicals with biological processes. Our focus is to study the process of drug and nanoparticle (NPs) distribution throughout the body which consists of a system of ordinary differential equations. We develop a new tri-compartmental model to study the perfusion of NPs in tissues and a new six-compartmental model to study drug distribution in different body organs. Pharmacokinetic and physiological models are useful means to demonstrate the relationships between different drug administrations, and drug exposure or concentration. Increasing the importance of studies about tumors and cancer therapy and concentration of drugs and NPs in tumors or other tissues has enhanced the significance of pharmacokinetic models in different industries.

  • (W) Playing with Toy Trucks Leads to Serious Modeling.
    (R3) Tova Brown, Mathematics, Wisconsin Lutheran College, Milwaukee WI USA and Brody Johnson, Mathematics, Saint Louis University, St. Louis MO USA Modeling the Velocity of a Pull-Back Toy (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: This workshop focuses on a modeling scenario that examines the motion of a simple pull-back toy using a second-order linear differential equation. Students can collect their own data by racing pull-back toys, or use provided data, and carry out parameter estimation by comparing a numerical solution to the experimental data. There are three goals for the workshop. First, participants will learn a bit about how the project progressed from a rough idea to a published modeling scenario. Second, participants will have the opportunity to play the role of students by implementing one of the two proposed models for the pull-back toy with real data. Finally, participants will hear about an implementation of the modeling scenario in two levels of calculus, including students' perspectives on the project.

  • (E) "Beam me up," Scotty, with PDE Model
    (R4A) Tiernan Fogarty, Mathematics, Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls OR USA Beam Equation Modeling Exercise (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: A classroom exercise is designed and implemented to guide students through experimentation, data collection, modeling, and parameter estimation. Students measure the vertical deflection that occurs as a result of the weight of a beam hanging in three different configurations. Data is collected and a model is built to describe the vertical deflection. A governing ordinary differential equation can be inferred and used to estimate parameters of the beam medium.

  • (E) Deflections Yield Parameters
    (R4B) Jim Fischer, Mathematics, Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls OR USA Parameter Estimation Using Beam Deflection (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Students estimate the Young’s modulus of a small beam by using one or two measurements of deflection together with the analytic solution of the corresponding boundary value problem. Here we choose a beam and beam length so that when supported there is no measurable deflection. A single point mass is then suspended from the beam so that a measurable deflection occurs. Students solve the appropriate Euler-Bernoulli boundary value problem and use their solution and collected data to both estimate the Young’s modulus and validate the mathematical model. The concentrated point mass is modeled using the Dirac delta function; students construct the model and find the analytic solution using the symbolic calculus of generalized functions. This project should be considered a work in progress as it has not yet been tested in the classroom.
    [1] Fogarty, Tiernan R. and Gregg Waterman. 2016. 9-120-S-HorizontalBeam.
    [2] Brody Dylan Johnson. 2021. 9-125-S-BeamModeling.

  • (W) Value in Eigenvalues for Modeling Building
    (R5) Jeff Anderson, Foothill College, Los Altos Hills CA USA Make eigenvalues resonate with our students (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: We present a learning activity that enables students to apply eigenvalue theory to model a useful physical phenomenon. Specifically, we demonstrate how to build a spring-coupled pair of pendula and how students can analyze this system using eigenvalues. This activity can be designed to enhance student motivation and prepares students to apply differential equations and linear algebra while building authentic experiences with mathematical modeling inside the classroom.

    We demonstrate how to build an apparatus and develop an experimental framework that enables students to apply eigenvalue theory within the context of a useful mathematical modeling problem. To achieve this goal, we show participants how to design and assembled a spring-coupled pair of pendula. We also provide a modeling scheme that supports students in analyzing the dynamics of this system using eigenvalue theory. The entire apparatus and data acquisition system is easy-to-build, inexpensive, simple-to-assemble, safe, and of appropriate size for in-class demonstrations and student laboratory explorations.

    This modeling activity puts students in the driver's seat as applied mathematicians and empowers each student to evaluate the eigenvalue theory within the context of an observable phenomenon. Moreover, this process highlights the type of applied mathematical thinking that students need to transfer content knowledge from the classroom into their world.

    This presentation will engage participants using each of the following: an Icebreaker activity, a detailed discussion of ways this activity might be integrated into classroom learning, a next-steps reflection activity where participants brainstorm about possible next steps, and a question and answer period at the end of the presentation to engage participants in this discussion.

    In addition, participants will be given access to a support website that includes online videos to introduce relevant curriculum, a laboratory project prompt that can be assigned to students, sample experiment videos that can be used in the classroom, example spreadsheets that provide analysis for the modeling process, and many other resources for use in the classroom.

    This presentation is designed for teachers and learners of differential equations, linear algebra, or mathematical modeling. The activity described in this work fits nicely into introductory ODE and linear algebra classes that traditionally show up in the first two years of many college STEM degrees. However, motivated high school teachers might also enjoy this activity as an open-ended project to get students engaged in college-level explorations.

    Finaly, we offer Eigenvalue Post. and our support website. so that everyone can access all the resources.

  • (E) You Should Not Fall for Just Any Model
    (R6A) Kurt Bryan, Mathematics, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute IN USA Falling Shuttlecocks and the Akaike Information Criterion (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Falling bodies can be modeled using a linear model for air resistance, a pure quadratic model, something in between, or even a "no air resistance" model. Distinguishing which model does the best job is not clear cut, and the ultimate verdict must be provided by data. Simple models are preferred, but only if they do a reasonable job at explaining the data. More complex models with more parameters may better fit the data, but its not clear that these models truly represent reality. I'll show one classical criterion for balancing simplicity in the model with fidelity to data.

  • (E) Can Mathematics Make Your Heart Beat?
    (R6B) Arati Nanda Pati, Mathematics, University of St. Thomas, Houston TX USA Heart Death Rate: An Elementary Modeling With Data (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: In this elementary modeling activity, we offer simulation experience from a given data set which represents the heart death rate during the period 2000 - 2010 using several approaches to include exponential decay, difference equation, differential equation, and parameter estimation using EXCEL. In this talk, we present an introductory approach to understand the role of a parameter and estimate it using EXCEL spreadsheet in the differential equation setting.

Day 2 - 2:15 PM–3:15 PM: Breakout Time

Engage and converse with others with similar interests in these informal breakout sessions.

  • *** MOVED TO Friday, 4:00 - 4:45 PM ***
    (R1) Moderator Josh Holden, Mathematics, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute IN USA How to Change Your Mind and Find New Projects in Mathematics

    Abstract: At some point, everyone feels like they're not sure what to do next. Maybe you have no ideas and maybe you have too many! I invite people who have been or anticipate being in either of those situations to share experiences, obstacles, and/or solutions. Personally, I originally thought I wanted to be a primarily research-focused mathematician. After my first job, I discovered I was spending more time on teaching than research, so I reoriented myself towards undergraduate teaching. In the course of that, I changed my research topic from pure algebraic number theory to topics in cryptography that were accessible and interesting to undergraduates. Since then I have branched my educational activities out into adult education and writing for the general public, and I have branched my research areas out into the ways that mathematics and art inspire and inform each other.

  • (R2) Moderators Sara Waldman, Kayden Manley, and Theresa Rahikka, National Security Agency, Fort Meade MD USA Informal Discussions About Opportunities for Mathematicians at National Security Agency

    Abstract: This time is designed to provide for informal discussions and questions about working for the National Security Agency using mathematics. Both students and faculty are encouraged to stop by and learn about the many exciting opportunities at NSA.

  • (R3) Moderator Tova Brown, Mathematics, Wisconsin Lutheran College, Milwaukee WI USA How to find summer student experiences

    Abstract: Tova Brown: As a student myself, I benefited greatly from two summer experiences and I'm passionate about their value. As a young faculty member whose summers have both been during the pandemic, none of my students have gone out to do them yet, but I am encouraging some to apply for programs this year. We would welcome colleagues who have more recent experience actually sending students or hosting a program and/or an older student who has participated recently themselves and/or someone with experience in internships or more industrial programs.

  • (R4) Moderator Elizabeth Carlson, PIMS Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Victoria, Mathematics and Statistics, Victoria BC CANADA You Just Might Consider Working in a Lab Setting

    Abstract: What are the paths and steps that might lead to a lab position as Post Doc or somewhere along the way? Share experiences and ask questions.

  • (R5) Moderator Kurt Bryan, Mathematics, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute IN USA Discussion of SIMIODE Textbook, Differential Equations: A Toolbox for Modeling the World (Slides)

    Abstract: Meet the author of SIMIODE's textbook Differential Equations: A Toolbox for Modeling the World and discuss the text and its use as well as broader teaching differential equations tdhrough modeling issues. This is a chance for textbook users to share their reactions, ideas, uses, and suggestions.

Day 2 - 3:15 PM–4:00 PM: Keynote Speaker

  • (M) Amit Sahai, Computer Science, University of California, Los Angeles CA USA; Christopher Havens, Executive Director and Founder, Prison Mathematics Project, TRU at Monroe Correctional Complex, Monroe WA USA; Ruth Utnage, Executive Assistant, Prison Mathematics Project, Seattle WA USA; and Trubee Davison, Mathematics, Western Colorado University, Gunnison CO USA The Prison Mathematics Project: Justice via the Pursuit of Bea (Prison Math Project Newsletter) (Video)

    Abstract: The Prison Mathematics Project (PMP) works towards a new understanding of the role of mathematics in self-identity and desistance among a demographic of prisoners who are actively exploring a higher education. We aim to achieve positive changes in self-identity and desistance by providing knowledge, instilling a sense of community and culture, and establishing network connections to promote self-rehabilitation among participants throughengagement of mathematics. Such engagement is nurtured through active mentorship by members of the mathematical community.

    We offer an invitation to all who seek to improve upon techniques in teaching and learning mathematics in highly restrictive environments. The PMP sees a world where desistance can be achieved through a community based system of restorative justice through giving back via mathematics, so that cognitive changes and the restructuring ofone's lifestyle occur as a result of mentor/participant dynamics.

    A description of how PMP works and how to become involved will be offered. There will be a highlighting of some of the ways we help our participants contribute to society. One such item is a first ever research efforts, consistingsolely of prisoners from across the United States. The research is in number theory, with a computation theoretic feel. Projects like this not only give purpose, but inspire transformative experiences which act as ways for measuring community involvement of participants.

    Here is a copy of the Prison Math Newsletter 3.

Day 2 - 4:00 PM–4:45 PM: Breakout Time

Engage and converse with others with similar interests in these informal breakout sessions.

  • (R1) Moderators Tim Pennings, Mathematics, Davenport University, Grand Rapids MI USA; Ruth Utnage, Executive Assistant, Prison Mathematics Project, Seattle WA USA; and Trubee Davison, Mathematics, Western Colorado University, Gunnison CO USA The Prison Mathematics Project: Opportunities for Serving Others (Personal Testimony)

    Abstract: There will be discussion and sharing, offering participant perspective (prisoner and mentor) based on engagement in Prison Mathematics Project as well as details on how to participate.

    Here is a copy of the Prison Math Newsletter 3.

  • SPECIAL PANEL - Women Leaders of Mathematics Organizations Invite Participation
    (R2) Moderator Brian Winkel, SIMIODE, Chardon OH USA - Kate Kozak, President American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges, Mathematics, Coconino Community College, Flagstaff AZ USA; Hortensia Soto, President-Elect Mathematical Association of America, Mathematics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO USA; Torina Lewis, Associate Executive Director of Meetings and Professional Services - American Mathematical Society, Mathematics, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta GA USA Mathematics Organizations Opportunities (Slides - AMATYC) (Slides - AMS) (Slides - MAA)

    Abstract: During this panel each of the women who lead these three major mathematics organizations will present highlights of membership and what the organizations are doing for mathematics education followed by questions and answers.

    Specifically, for example Kate Kozak will discuss professional development offered by AMATYC, publications, and how we are addressing diversity as an organization.

  • Get Paid to Learn
    (R3) Moderators Jeff Anderson and Henry Fan, Mathematics, Foothill College, Los Altos Hills CA USA Approaches to Earning Scholarship and Internships

    Abstract: In this conversation, we explore practices and ideas that participants can use to build a systematic approach to searching for and earning scholarship and internships. We help you find ways to increase your income, decrease student loan debt, and maximize the value you create in your college experience. This breakout session will be interactive and feature some reading, some writing, and some dialog. This is part of a larger project, known as The Learning Code, focused on helping you make learning meaningful, achievable, and purposeful. For more about the learning code, please look at our Learning Code blog. Further we offer Learning Code Post.

  • *** MOVED FROM Thursday, 2:15-3:15 PM *** National Science Foundation Opportunities
    (R4) Presenter Michael Ferrara, Program Director, Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE), Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR), National Science Foundation, Alexandria VA USA Funding Opportunities in the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education (Slides)

    Abstract: The Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) at the National Science Foundation offers a variety of grant programs that promote innovations in learning and teaching and/or infrastructural support in the mathematical sciences. In this presentation, we will give an overview of several current programs with upcoming deadlines and discuss features of successful proposals. The remainder of the session will be reserved for Q&A and a discussion on proposal preparation, NSF policies, and other topics of interest to attendees.

  • *** MOVED FROM Friday, 2:15-3:15 PM *** Change of Mind and Projects
    (R5) Moderator Josh Holden, Mathematics, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute IN USA How to Change Your Mind and Find New Projects in Mathematics

    Abstract: At some point, everyone feels like they're not sure what to do next. Maybe you have no ideas and maybe you have too many! I invite people who have been or anticipate being in either of those situations to share experiences, obstacles, and/or solutions. Personally, I originally thought I wanted to be a primarily research-focused mathematician. After my first job, I discovered I was spending more time on teaching than research, so I reoriented myself towards undergraduate teaching. In the course of that, I changed my research topic from pure algebraic number theory to topics in cryptography that were accessible and interesting to undergraduates. Since then I have branched my educational activities out into adult education and writing for the general public, and I have branched my research areas out into the ways that mathematics and art inspire and inform each other.

Day 2 - 4:45 PM–5:45 PM: Presentations on Practical Things that Work in the Classroom

Simultaneous sessions have two 25 minute presentations with a 5 minute break in between. What practical things work in the classroom? Sessions will provide experiences of practical things that work and reflect on meaning of "works".

  • When Regression Works and When it Does Not Work
    (R1A) Mark Nelson, School of Mathematics and Applied Statistics University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW AUSTRALIA Time of death: linking differential equations and linear regression (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: An individual says that they left for a business meeting at 2 pm and returned at 8 pm to find their partner dead. The first temperature measurement of the dead body was made at 9pm. The individual says that they were home all morning and that their partner was alive and well when they left.

    1. Analyse the body temperature measurements reported and estimate the time-of-death. Identify the uncertainty in your estimate.

    2. To what extent is your predicted time-of-death consistent with information provided by the individual?

    In this presentation I discuss my experiences when I set questions in a second year applied mathematics subject which required students to use linear regression, a technique from a first year statistics subject. What mistakes did students make? What mistakes did I make? Can students correctly estimate the time-of-death? How can this type of question be modified? My biggest surprise is not that students made mistakes. No, my biggest surprise was the nature of the "mistake" made by most of the software they used to carry out the regression analysis.

  • What's in an ENIGMA - Students Find Out
    (R1B) Stuart Boersma, Mathematics, Central Washington University, Ellensburg WA USA The Daily Breaking of Enigma: A student project (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: A brief overview of the Polish attack on Enigma will be presented together with a class project that lets students experience the type of cryptanalytic work that I believe the Polish codebreakers performed on a daily basis. The project can be tailored to a variety of difficulty levels depending on the number of hints and the type of scaffolding provided. Students will deduce permutations, factor permutations, use cribs to determine plugboard settings, and, eventually, decrypt an important Enigma intercept.

  • Well-Prepared Students is the Goal
    (R2A) Sasha Townsend, Mathematics, Tulsa Community College, Tulsa OK USA Training Well-Prepared Students: Standards Based Grading (SBG) with Backwards Design - Part I (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Students entering the calculus and differential equations sequence don't typically end their education with a two-year degree. At TBU (The Big University) or in their upper division coursework, we want them to know what they're doing. In this presentation, I'll share how backwards design informs SBG course design in my calculus and DE courses at TCC. Instead of using a percentage-based system, with standards-based grading, grades are determined by how well the student displays a mastery of mathematical concepts and techniques called standards. Students may improve their grades on each standard through reassessment quizzes. Through clearly articulating expectations and focusing student and instructor attention on areas where the student can improve, the design encourages learning, enhances motivation, provides accountability, and prepares students for the work expected of them in differential equations and upper division coursework.

  • Well-Prepared Students is the Goal Moreso
    (R2B) Sasha Townsend, Mathematics, Tulsa Community College, Tulsa OK USA Training Well-Prepared Students: Standards Based Grading (SBG) with Backwards Design - Part II (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Students entering the calculus and differential equations sequence don't typically end their education with a two-year degree. At TBU (The Big University) or in their upper division coursework, we want them to know what they're doing. In this presentation, I'll share how backwards design informs SBG course design in my calculus and DE courses at TCC. Instead of using a percentage-based system, with standards-based grading, grades are determined by how well the student displays a mastery of mathematical concepts and techniques called standards. Students may improve their grades on each standard through reassessment quizzes. Through clearly articulating expectations and focusing student and instructor attention on areas where the student can improve, the design encourages learning, enhances motivation, provides accountability, and prepares students for the work expected of them in differential equations and upper division coursework.

  • Going Video for Added Value
    (R3A) Trefor Bazett, Mathematics, University of Victoria, Victoria BC CANADA The Classroom vs YouTube: What Works and What Does Not Work (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: As an educational YouTuber, my math videos are watched by orders of magnitude more people than will ever attend my classes. As a professor, the relationships I build with my students are far deeper than I will ever make with viewers on YouTube. In this talk, I will explore what things work effectively on YouTube in contrast to what things work effectively in the classroom. There are a lot of similarities – being engaging is crucial for both! – but there are also some important differences and we can learn from both domains. I’ll conclude with a few practical tips for getting started in educational social media.

  • Modeling, Thinking, and Understanding
    (R3B) Keith Nabb, Mathematics, Piedmont Virginia Community College, Charlottesville VA USA Inquiry in Differential Equations (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: This presentation will focus on my reflections from three semesters as a teacher of Inquiry-Oriented Differential Equations. Prior to using inquiry, I had taught the class using what would probably be called the traditional approach—introducing various theories associated with differential equations, classifying differential equations, and then solving them through this theory. With inquiry, the focus shifts to equal balances of modeling concrete situations, thinking about the mathematics associated with such ideas, and understanding the structural qualities of differential equations.
    A typical classroom activity would have groups of three/four students deriving differential equations (either from data or from a list of assumptions), giving mathematical meaning to the assumptions provided, resolving any conflicts that may arise from different perspectives, and even imposing their own assumptions to suit the needs of the task. Toward the end of the class period, each group would present their findings to the class and provide reasons/justification for their claims. At this time, other groups were encouraged to examine this work critically and ask questions and/or make suggestions. During this time, I, as teacher, took a secondary role as facilitator to classroom discourse. The final 10-15 minutes of class time was used to openly discuss/validate the work of the groups with the teacher leading the discussion. The culmination of each activity resulted in reaching a consensus on a practical approach to the problem, agreeing on a common way to notate such findings, and linking students’ informal reasoning with formal notions—all with an emphasis on conceptual understanding and growth. This time was also used to capitalize on commonalities found across different group’s work and to associate such findings with mathematical convention.
    In this session, I will spend some time detailing my struggles in teaching this class for the first time and how my comfort level and skill gradually increased upon the second and third implementation. Discussion foci will be classroom preparation and discourse, student expectations, and assessment practices. Moreover, I will provide student comments from each semester concerning attitudes about the course and what they felt was gained from inquiry. Finally, I will provide some comments as to why I feel inquiry may be a fruitful direction for many years to come.

  • Euler Comes to Class
    (R4A) Andrew B. Perry, Mathematics, Springfield College, Springfield MA USA Leonhard Euler's Differential Equations (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: The Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler (1707-1783) is known to modern students of differential equations as the inventor of Euler's method for approximating the solution of a first order linear differential equation with initial value. Euler wrote extensively on differential equations as well as calculus more generally. We will look at some of his writings on differential equations as well as implementing Euler's method using software.

Day 2 - 5:45 PM–7:00 PM: Free Time

A break in the program with an opportunity to meet colleagues to discuss areas of interest. The conference platform will be open for self-directed dinner conversations.

Day 2 - 7:00 PM–8:00 PM: Presentations on Social Issues and Opportunities

Simultaneous sessions have two 25 minute presentations with a 5 minute break in between. Social Issues — What are they? How might we address them and use them to motivate learning?

  • Casting Wide Net in Designing Learning Environments
    (R1A) Hayley Orndorf, BioQUEST, Pittsburgh PA USA Beyond Average: Designing for Variability with Universal Design for Learning (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines advocate for designing learning environments and materials to plan for variability rather than average, better supporting all learners in becoming experts in how they learn. UDL was developed by CAST in the 1990s using learning and neuroscience research. With three principles, nine guidelines, and 31 checkpoints, the UDL framework can at first be overwhelming, particularly when considering revising existing learning materials.
    This short presentation will introduce the UDL guidelines, noting how UDL relates to accessibility and inclusive teaching practices and complements approaches like Backwards Design. We will also explore strategies for identifying and implementing UDL checkpoints in iterative ways that reduce barriers for learners and instructors. Participants will leave with resources to support them in analyzing their materials for existing alignment with UDL and implementing additional UDL checkpoints.

  • Not Just Good Stuff, but Open and Accessible Good Stuff - a How to Guide
    (R1B) Hayley Orndorf, BioQUEST, Pittsburgh PA USA Open and Accessible: Improving STEM OER Using an Accessibility Framework (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: This session will introduce participants to ISKME's STEM OER Accessibility Framework: A Practical Guide for Curators and Authors of STEM Open Educational Resources. The framework was developed to align with principles of open education, Universal Design for Learning and W3C's POUR framework; in this session we will discuss how those frameworks relate to developing accessible STEM learning materials.
    Together we will explore the STEM OER Accessibility Framework, examples of accessible STEM OER, and discuss strategies for using the guidebook to evaluate and improve learning materials through a lens of OER accessibility.

  • Mathematics Reaches South, Way South
    (R2A) Sarah Quebec Fuentes, Mathematics, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth TX USA and Mark A. Bloom, Science, Dallas Baptist University, Dallas TX USA International Consortium for Research in Science & Mathematics Education (ICRSME) (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Conceived in 1983, the mission of ICRSME is the advancement of science and mathematics education in the participating countries. This mission is based on the premise that all peoples can benefit from the knowledge and experiences of their local, national, and international colleagues. Since 1986, ICRSME has conducted fifteen collaborative consultations in Central and South America and Caribbean countries. At each consultation, university professors, graduate students, and public school teachers have had the opportunity to share their personal experiences and research-based practices regarding science and mathematics education. The focus of this presentation is on the challenges and affordances of international collaboration in science and mathematics education as well as the current activities and opportunities within ICRSME.

  • Collaborative Biology and Mathematics Opportunities
    (R2B) Sam Donovan, Director of Outreach and Strategic Engagement, BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium, Pittsburgh PA USA (BioQUEST) Adapting BioQUEST and QUBES Resources to Accelerate STEM Education Reform (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: This informal presentation will provide an overview of the resources available from the BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium and the QUBES platform to support individuals and projects. These resources grow out of an effort to promote faculty centric innovations by providing teachers with opportunities to engage in the scholarship of teaching and learning. The QUBES OER Library, Faculty Mentoring Networks, and collaborative spaces for group work will be described and examples shared. More information is available at QUBEShub.org.

  • Letters from Math Camp
    (R3A) Scott Taylor, Sum Camp Producer, Mathematics, Colby College, Waterville ME USA Starting a local summer math camp (Info) (Video)

    Abstract: In 2019, I and a group of local teachers started a summer camp designed to use the arts and math games to instill a basic sense of numeracy in local public school children who are behind grade level in math. I'll describe the vision for the camp and its future, our partnership with the local public schools, and our current funding strategies and future plans.

Day 2 - 8:00 PM–9:00 PM: Student Poster Session

Day 2 - 9:00 PM–10:00 PM: MathBowl

(M) Paul Fonstad, Mathematics, Franklin College, Franklin IN USAMathBowl Challenge - Download and Print Blank Answer Sheet and Get Ready for Fun (Slides)

Abstract: Experience the fun and challenge of answering mathematical content and trivia in a self-scoring activity for the pure joy of knowing what you know and what you don't know. See video from SIMIODE EXPO 2021.

Experience the joy of MathBowl with this night out for fun.

Day 2 - 10:00 PM–until: Free Time

The conference platform will be open for informal self-directed conversations and Zoom meetings.

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Day 3: 12 February 2022 (Eastern US Time)

Rooms for events are denoted Rxy for Room Rx, x =1,2,3, . . . and y for part of session y = A is first part and y = B is for second part.

Day 3 - 1:00 PM–1:15 PM: Opening Greeting

Introductions, SOCOCO Platform Orientation, Social Planning, Notions

Day 3 - 1:15 PM–2:00 PM: Keynote Speaker

  • (M) Craig Bauer, Mathematics, York College of Pennsylvania, York PA USA, Editor Cryptologia Why I Love Cryptology (and Why You Will Too) (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Cryptology intersects many other fascinating disciplines, such as history, art, music, crime, and the paranormal to an extent that is greater than any other mathematical discipline. It also has extremely strong connections with engineering, computer science, and most recently quantum mechanics. The overlap between cryptology and mathematics in general is nearly complete. In the talk, I will rapidly share examples of a great many of these intersections as justifications for my claim that you will love immersing yourself in cryptology. For those already familiar with the subject, I promise there will be several examples that you have likely missed and will greatly enjoy.

Day 3 - 2:00 PM–3:00 PM: Presentations on Jumping into Modeling with Differential Equations

Simultaneous sessions have two 25 minute presentations with a 5 minute break in between or a single 55 minute session.

  • Laplace to the rescue
    (R1) Kurt Bryan, Mathematics, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute IN USA Introducing ODEs Through Modeling and Applications (Slides) (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: I will show two models that I like to use in ODE courses. The first introduces ODEs using a model of a sprinter's progress down a track, the so-called "Hill-Keller" ODE. The process of developing this ODE involves using Newton's second law of motion, and the model can be evaluated using readily available data. The data allows us to estimate certain physical parameters and bring the modeling process full cycle. The second application involves using the Laplace transform in a simple control theory problem, a topic of great importance and wide utility that students would not normally see in an ODE course. This activity requires little time to set up but makes essential use of the Laplace transform to tackle a type of problem that is ubiquitous in modern technology.

  • Undergraduate Research in Collaborative Mode
    (R2A) Aditi Ghosh, Mathematics, Texas A&M University, Commerce TX USA It Takes Two to Tango: Building Capacity and Collaboration for Undergrad Research (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Student recruitment in Mathematics and helping students to understand the application of Mathematics to make lucrative career choices has become the need of the hour. One of my favorite ways to make students aware of the prospects of Applied Mathematics in today's world is to encourage them towards undergraduate research. I will focus on student collaboration and a project that I have worked on with them on Covid. Close-contact places such as long-term facilities have been found to be high-risk for COVID-19 outbreaks. The reasons include a vulnerable resident population, limited resources in facilities, close contacts with visitors and workers, contaminated resources, and ill-trained workers. In this study, we aim to identify and quantify the roles of different subpopulation and related infection transmission pathways, the time, duration and choice of interventions in real time to mitigate the impact of transmission of infections.

  • Introductory Course Modeling Efforts for Advanced Plebes
    (R3A) Kevin Quigley, Mathematics, United States Military Academy, West Point NY USA Math Modeling in the Advanced (Jedi) Math Program at West Point (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: We discuss the first course (MA153) of a two-semester advanced mathematics sequence for selected cadets who have successfully completed single variable calculus and demonstrated strength in the mathematical sciences prior to arrival at USMA. Cadets who complete the advanced math program tend to choose majors in the STEM disciplines and perform better academically than their peers. Thus, MA153 is designed to provide a foundation for the continued study of mathematics, sciences, and engineering. In the past two years, the focus of the course has shifted from almost entirely on ODE solutions to a greater emphasis on problem solving applications through the implementation of the USMA Math Modeling Triangle. The course revised and adopted several new structural changes in Fall 2021, to include remote placement exams prior to arrival, a calculus and linear algebra primer, and a culminating assessment arc to end each block—an individual exam and technology lab, followed by a group model application assignment. These assignments challenged cadets to work in teams, leverage technology, present results using a variety of communication modalities and even collaborate with instructors from other departments.

  • And What Techniques Stay and What Goes for Good Modeling Time?
    (R3B) Thomas Mussmann, Mathematics, United States Military Academy, West Point NY USA Reconsidering Integrating Factor: Keeping Consistency in an Introductory ODE Curriculum (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: We observe that first order, systems, and higher order ODEs all share general solutions as the superposition of the homogenous and non homogenous solutions. We seek to emphasize this similarity for our students by eliminating the technique of Integrating Factor from our curriculum and instead teach students to use separation of variables to solve the homogenous first order ODE and a variation of parameters technique to solve the non-homogeneous. This technique will help students understand the themes of an ODE course by teaching first and higher order ODEs under the same framework. We also propose eliminating higher order ODEs from our differential equation curriculum. We suggest that we should teach first order ODEs, systems of ODEs and an application of spring masses. During the application of spring masses, we show how to transform a second order ODE into a system of first order ODEs and conduct a traditional analysis of spring mass systems using the characteristic equation rather than the auxiliary equation.

  • Change is Afoot from Techniques to Modeling
    (R4A) Kyle Allaire, Mathematics, Worcester State University, Worcester MA USA Transitioning to a Modeling-First Approach in Differential Equations (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: As an early career faculty member, I have taught differential equations courses in the traditional technique-driven manner. However, after attending a SIMIODE workshop in Summer 2021, I was excited by the idea of using a modeling-first approach to teaching differential equations. In this talk, we will discuss resources for and implementation of various modeling activities, as well as the challenges associated with transitioning to a more modeling focused pedagogy. Furthermore, we will discuss the effect of a modeling-first approach on student motivation and interest in the subject matter.

  • Two-Year College Students Discover Research
    (R4B) Chris McCarthy, Mathematics, Borough of Manhattan Community College - CUNY, New York NY USA Student Research Projects and Opportunities at a Two-Year College (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: We discuss student research projects conducted in tihe two-year college environment through a rich supportive institutional network of opportunities. There is no one unique definition of undergraduate research and we discuss these variations and how one can enter the fray.

  • High School Students' Perspective on Mathematical Modeling
    (R5A) Adhvaith Sridhar and Bhanu Narra, Students, Wayzata High School, Plymouth MN USA Mathematical Modeling: A Multifaceted Exploration of Quantitative Representation (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Join us on a diverse exploration of mathematical modeling and its numerous facets.
    Mathematical models come in two types: those of immediate practical concern and more abstract models for research purposes. We will begin by presenting an application of mathematical modeling to a real-life scenario: finding the best, unique solar-power battery setup for business and home-owners who aim to switch to using solar-power. We then delve into the use of mathematical modeling for more abstract scenarios by discussing a model which characterizes the avian proclivity to pluck hair from animals for nest-construction, a practice known as "kleptotrichy." This second discussion will also feature insights into the incorporation of differential equations in mathematical modeling.
    The applicability of mathematical modeling is thus incredibly vast, and its capacity to quantitatively represent is of use in a multitude of areas. We will continue our talk with a discussion of the advantages of learning about math modeling as early as middle/secondary school. We will explore pathways for inspiring interest in math modeling and ways to implement math modeling experiences in high school education for preparation for future careers.
    We will also present a framework for developing mathematical models to simulate situations including defining a problem statement, outlining a solution, and filing in the details. We will conclude with a brief introduction on the use of computational software in modeling experiences.

  • Wireless Transmission of Electricity Via Magnetic Induction - Get a Charge out of This
    (R5B) Maila Hallare, Mathematics, Norfolk State University, Norfolk VA USA Laplace Meets Tesla in a Differential Equations Class (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Tesla’s ambition of wirelessly transmitting electricity using radio frequency resonance was never realized. Now, more than a hundred years after Tesla’s experiments, wireless transmission of electricity via magnetic induction is currently used in a humble household electronic: the wireless toothbrush. The wireless toothbrush is one of many household applications of a 2-coil wireless power transfer (WPT).

    In this talk, we look at a mathematical model of this WPT via magnetic induction. The system consists of two second-order differential equations coupled by a mutual inductance. With specific values for its passive components, we use Laplace transform methods to solve the resulting system. Then we look at how this topic may be embedded in a Differential Equations class, technologically supported by a free online circuit simulation software, and numerically investigated by spreadsheet data-fitting.

Day 3 - 3:00 PM–4:00 PM: Breakout Time

Engage and converse with others with similar interests in these informal breakout sessions.

  • (R1) Moderator Craig Bauer, Mathematics, York College of Pennsylvania, York PA USA, Editor Cryptologia What does it take to teach a course/seminar in cryptology?

    Abstract: Various approaches to building a course in cryptology will be discussed, e.g., emphasis on broad liberal arts or technical mathematics.

  • (R2) Moderator Brian Winkel, SIMIODE, Chardon OH USA You can render service to others and serve yourself as well

    Abstract: We engage in a discussion on the many service opportunities in a department and beyond, say, in a school, which are exciting. For example, consider being a seminar leader or visiting speaker organizer. This permits one to spend time with some pretty cool visitors while sharing them with students and faculty at your school. Or consider being an internship originator or supervisor with the industry contacts. Or participating in a wilderness course in which other cognate discipline faculty are interested in modeling and have lots of data.

  • (R3) Moderator Heather Lai, Mechanical Engineering, SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz NY USA How a Dynamics Mentors program has helped develop competency and confidence for mentors and mentees alike

    Abstract: Dynamics and System Dynamics are two of the most daunting courses in a Mechanical Engineering program. At SUNY New Paltz, we found that many of our students give up before they even begin, regardless of the skill and enthusiasm of the instructor. To address this, we developed a "Dynamics Mentor" program where faculty work with upper-class student mentors to train them to be able to provide guidance and enrichment to students currently enrolled the these two courses. In this presentation, I will describe the development of our Dynamics mentor program, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of our model, and in particular highlight the significance of having students mentor students on the confidence of student’s ability to solve problems in this discipline.

  • (R4) Moderator Jennie D'Ambroise, Mathematics, SUNY College at Old Westbury, Old Westbury NY USA How to Get Started with Modeling in Coursework

    Abstract: What are good first steps to incorporating modeling in any course? How might one use the Starter Kit material found in SIMIODE?

Day 3 - 4:00 PM–5:00 PM: Presentations on Getting the Word Out about Modeling

Simultaneous sessions have two 25 minute presentations with a 5 minute break in between.

  • Using SIMIODE Materials in Calculus as Adapted and Adopted
    (R1A) Jennie D'Ambroise, SUNY College at Old Westbury, Old Westbury NY USA Adapting SIMIODE Modeling Scenarios for Calculus (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Are you teaching a Calculus class and struggle to incorporate modeling into your syllabus? In this talk we will review two examples of modeling projects that were adapted from existing SIMIODE scenarios. The adapted lab projects are designed for Calculus I students with virtually no additional preparatory lecture needed aside from standard Calculus I material. The projects take a modeling first approach in order to help students discover differential equations through modeling. Each project includes basic components of a typical differential equations lecture that the students see for the first time within the modeling project. Through the projects students learn not only what a differential equation is, but how Calculus can be used in applications. This talk will focus on the pedagogical approach of adapting existing SIMIODE scenarios, with mindfulness towards an unforgiving required syllabus schedule for your Calculus class.

  • Publishing Modeling Materials - Two Offerings
    (R1B) (i) Paul Campbell, Mathematics Beloit College, Beloit WI USA and Editor The UMAP Journal of Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications and
    (ii) Brian Winkel, Director SIMIODE, Chardon OH USA (i) Modeling Publication Opportunities for Modeling Materials (Slides) (Video) and (ii) What is the process of publishing your classroom modeling with differential equations materials in SIMIODE? (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: (i) Suppose that you devise a differential equation model of a phenomenon and you think that your idea is worthy of dissemination to colleagues and students. You could just write it up as a paper and submit it to a journal to become an article. But that is not the only model for publication. The UMAP Journal, now in its 43rd year, offers other models that---depending on the nature of your work and your intentions---might be more effective ways to publicize your ideas. Come hear what those can be.
    (ii) SIMIODE offers peer reviewed, double-blind review of submitted materials, essentially of two kinds. Modeling Scenarios are teaching materials in which a model is the focus and may lead to newly introduced mathematics or revisit established course mathematics while Technique Narratives or teaching materials for focus on a solution strategy or technique, BUT with modeling to support the solution strategies and consequences. We discuss the nature of what is appropriate and the process of publication.

  • Using SIMIODE Materials in Calculus as Adapted and Adopted
    (R2A) Jean Marie Linhart, Central Washington University, Ellensburg WA USA Exploring Modeling Assumptions with Census Data (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Students who have studied models for population are likely to be familiar with the exponential and the logistic population models. The goal here is to explore the role of modeling assumptions in choosing which model to use. We will compare the United States census data and the Guatemala census data, and how these two datasets fulfill or fail to fulfill the modeling assumptions of the exponential and logistic models. Along the way, we will introduce the concept of the per capita population growth rate and calculate the per capita population growth rate for the exponential model, the logistic model, and estimate the per capita population growth rate from the two census datasets. This talk and modeling scenario were inspired by a student's work on an in-class modeling project.

  • Happy Holidays with Mathematics
    (R3A) Yanping Ma, Mathematics, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles CA USA Math for the holidays (Slides) and (Slides-Michael Rogers Art) (Video)

    Abstract: The traditional way of teaching lower-level differential equations focused mainly on introducing a list of analytic methods. It is crucial to demonstrate the power of differential equations in solving application problems in that course. Also, we value an inclusive classroom that can involve students from different backgrounds and majors. Students are all familiar with popular holidays or festive occasions. Hence, we use projects relevant to holidays in our DE classes and will share them in this talk. You are invited to join the Breakout session between 2:00 and 3:00 PM on Day 4, Sunday, 13 February 2022, to share yours or hear others' ideas.

  • Communicating Your Mathematics
    (R3B) Olga Menagarishvili, Technical Communication and Interaction Design, Metropolitan State University, Saint Paul MN USA and Rikki Wagstrom, Mathematics and Statistics, Metropolitan State University, Saint Paul MN USA Integrating Technical Communication into a Mathematical Modeling Course (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract:Technical communication skills enable collaborators to work together and manage project tasks effectively as well as to create well-designed and coherent reports, presentations, computer code, and spreadsheets that work well for specific audiences and accomplish their purpose. As these activities are always involved in mathematical modeling endeavors, technical communication skills become fundamentally important. In this presentation, we discuss an initiative to integrate technical communication instruction into an undergraduate mathematical modeling course. The course was co-taught in the spring 2021 term by members of the Technical Communication and Interaction Design and Mathematics and Statistics departments. The course emphasized project-based learning with technical communication instruction provided at various stages of the projects. The students received instruction on fundamental principles and practices within technical communication, with application to teamwork and the creation of graphs, spreadsheets, technical reports, executive summaries, and presentations.

Day 3 - 4:00 PM–5:00 PM: SPECIAL SESSION - Presentations on Participation in SCUDEM 

  • SIMIODE Challenge Using Differential Equations Modeling (SCUDEM)
    (S1A) Anthony Stefan, Mathematics, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne FL USA Overview and Excitement of SCUDEM Experience for Student Teams (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: We share a brief introduction to SCUDEM from top to bottom; its purpose and opportunity, history, format, participation, results, etc. What does SCUDEM offer student participants, coaches, and judges? What practical activities can teams and coaches do to prepare for the SCUDEM Challenge? What can participation in SCUDEM mean after SCUDEM?

  • An Outstanding SCUDEM VI 2021 Team Presentation
    (S1B) Alexander Bugielski, Miles Pophal, and Anthony Domingo Garcia Romano, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne FL USA Student Team Response: Moderation Model for SCUDEM VI 2021 (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Problem C "Submitted a Tweet, Now What" divided people into at least two groups of similar viewpoints and our goal was to mathematically model how content warnings or moderation influenced group population. Using graph theory we developed a stochastic differential equation that quantifies how these factors and moderation strategies on social media can change an individual's viewpoint and their immediate social circle over time.

Day 3 - 5:00 PM–5:45 PM: SCUDEM Breakout Time

  • (S1) Moderator Jiyeon Suh, Mathematics, Grand Valley State University, Allendale MI USA Team Discussion of Approaches to Problem A - Hair Pulling To Line Your Nest

    Abstract: This is an opportunity for participants who selected Problem A and others curious about the SCUDEM process to talk over their approaches to the problem and the video productiomn. All problems can be found here. Questions include how and why they selected this problem? What interested them in it? What paths did they take (reject)? How did they organize their time and efforts and produce their final video? Finally, any suggestions on how to improve SCUDEM from student perspective would be appropriate.

  • (S2) Moderator Lily Zhang, Macalester College, Saint Paul MN USA Team Discussion of Approaches to Problem B - Throw The Bike Or Throw The Race

    Abstract: This is an opportunity for participants who selected Problem B and others curious about the SCUDEM process to talk over their approaches to the problem and the video productiomn. All problems can be found here. Questions include how and why they selected this problem? What interested them in it? What paths did they take (reject)? How did they organize their time and efforts and produce their final video? Finally, any suggestions on how to improve SCUDEM from student perspective would be appropriate.

  • (S3) Moderator Arati Nanda Pati, Mathematics, University of St. Thomas, Houston TX USA Team Discussion of Approaches to Problem C - Submitted a Tweet, Now What?

    Abstract: This is an opportunity for participants who selected Problem C and others curious about the SCUDEM process to talk over their approaches to the problem and the video productiomn. All problems can be found here. Questions include how and why they selected this problem? What interested them in it? What paths did they take (reject)? How did they organize their time and efforts and produce their final video? Finally, any suggestions on how to improve SCUDEM from student perspective would be appropriate.

  • (S4) Moderator Anthony Stefan, Mathematics, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne FL USA Coaches Discussion on Role and Support of Student Teams

    Abstract: This is an opportunity for coaches and those who would like to coach in SCUDEM to share experiences, make suggestions for improvements, and help improve the coaching experience AND the student participant experience.

  • (S5) Moderator Brian Winkel, SIMIODE, Chardon OH USA Judges Discussion on Process, Rubric, Enjoyment, and Improvements

    Abstract: This is a gathering of judges and others interested in judging for SCUDEM to go over experiences, make suggestions for improvements, and consider the Scoring Rubric for SCUDEM.

Day 3 - 5:00 PM–5:45 PM: Breakout Time

Engage and converse with others with similar interests in these informal breakout sessions.

  • (R1) Moderators Tova Brown, Mathematics, Wisconsin Lutheran College, Milwaukee WI USA, Rosemary Farley, Mathematics, Manhattan College, Riverdale NY USA, Patrice Tiffany, Mathematics, Manhattan College, Riverdale NY USA Faculty Development in Early Career Stage - How Does it Happen?

    Abstract: Development does NOT really "just happen." Rather it is a thoughtful process involving time management, commitment to an activity, passion for a cause, and hard work. There are elements of risk involved as well when one ventures out. We talk about all of this and more with examples.

  • (R2) Moderator David Feldman, Physics and Mathematics, College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor ME USA Rethinking Calculus in the spirit of SIMIODE

    Abstract: The theme of this conference and the SIMIODE project is that a modeling-first approach to differential equations is effective, relevant, and engaging for students. What if we took a similarly radical stance toward our calculus courses? Second-term calculus (integrals and series) in particular often strikes me as disconnected from much of the practice of science and applied mathematics. There are days when I want to burn Calculus II to the ground and re-build something different. What would a 21-st century, engaged, inclusive, and relevant Calculus course look like?

  • (R3) Moderators Olga Menagarishvili, Technical Communication and Interaction Design, Metropolitan State University, Saint Paul MN USA and Rikki Wagstrom, Mathematics and Statistics, Metropolitan State University, Saint Paul MN USA Integrating Technical Communication into a Mathematical Modeling Course - Discussions

    Abstract: Take this opportunity to discuss methods and approaches to building technical communication skills in support of mathematics.

Day 3 - 5:45 PM–6:30 PM: Presentations on Creating, Modifying, or Using Modeling in a Differential Equations Course

Simultaneous sessions have two 20 minute presentations with a 5 minute break in between.

  • Growing Success in Technology and Modeling Over the Years
    (R1A) Rosemary Farley and Patrice Tiffany, Mathematics, Manhattan College, Riverdale NY USA The Efficacy of Modeling with Technology (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: This presentation will show how modeling in Differential Equations can be an effective pedagogical tool that motivates students and promotes retention of concepts. We will speak of our approach to modeling in Differential Equations and how it grew out of our approach to teaching Calculus with technology. We will share how our combined lecture/lab format works, (both online and face-to-face), how SIMIODE scenarios are modified for our own classes and how we integrate the scenarios into course assessment and grades. We will show examples of projects that have proven effective in our classes.

  • Up, Up, and Away by Modeling Gliders
    (R1B) Hector Mera Couto, Mathematics, Montgomery County Community College, Blue Bell PA USA Illustrating the Dynamics of Gliders Using Differential Equations and Flight Simulators (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: We derive the equations of motion for gliders moving in a vertical plane, under gravity and quadratic drag and lift forces. The resulting equations are parametrized using available real data for a variety of aircrafts and birds and solved by computer. The predictions of the model are compared with the behaviour of gliders on a free online flight simulator. Parameters such as the density and gravity are changed to describe gliding motion in different planetary atmospheres. This experience is implemented as part of the learning activities in MAT223 –the Differential Equations course that I teach at Montgomery County Community College– both as a gamified lecture and a student research project. Learning activities in MAT223 include research and computer modelling on classical differential equations topics such as Chaotic Love Triangles, Chaotic Behaviour on Neurons, Delay Differential Equations, Gliding Motion, and Addictive Behaviour.

  • Sometimes Modeling Can Get You into Hot Water
    (R2A) Viktoria Savatorova, Mathematical Sciences, Central Connecticut State University, New Britain CT USA and Aleksei Talonov, Mathematical Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas NV USA Teaching differential equations through modeling: hot water heater (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: We present an example of the very first modeling project we assign to students in our ODE class. Students are asked to determine how to run the cost-efficient heated hot water system. We consider a cylindrical tank filled with water and heated by a heating element immersed in it. Given the temperature of the surroundings, volume of water, sizes of the tank and the power of the heating element, we want to know how long it would take tor water to reach the desired temperature. Students study the effect of an increase of the power on the time of heating. The other task is to decide whether it can be cheaper to switch the heater off for several hours every day or to use a thermostat that switches the heater on and off each time the temperature drops below or raises above some particular values.

    Working on this project students learn how to set up a model and solve the first order differential equations analytically and numerically. They use MATLAB or Mathematica to visualize slope field and implement Euler and/or Runge-Kutta 4 methods.

  • Making Teaching About the Spread of a Cold Your Own Activity
    (R2B) Cheryl Potocki, Charter School of Wilmington, Wilmington DE USA Adapting the Spread of A Cold SIMIODE activity by Corban Harwood for use in various high school mathematics courses. (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: The Spread of a Cold activity from SIMIODE uses a simulation that yields a logistic function model. Logistic functions are a topic in our Pre-Calculus course, AP Calculus BC course, and our Modeling with Differential Equations course. Our school is a STEM school with students who arrive with many levels of Math experience and ability. Thus, the Spread of Cold activity has been modified to meet the needs of struggling learners in the Pre-calc class, more advanced mathematics learners in the AP Calculus BC course and our most advanced students engaging in post AP level work in our math modeling with Differential Equations course. All students engage in the simulation activity gathering data from which to build a model. The nature of the questioning and steps to create the model is differentiated for each group. The different versions of the materials used and some student responses for each will be shared along with observations and thoughts.

  • MOOCS, Textbooks, Radically Modeling Focused Differential Equations
    (R3) David Feldman, Physics and Mathematics, College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor ME USA MOOCS, Textbooks, and Radical DE Course (Slides)

    Abstract: In this presentation I will discuss three related projects. First, I will describe a radically modeling-focused differential equation course. Second, I will share some thoughts on two online MOOCs that I have developed, one on chaos and dynamical systems and one on fractals and scaling. These MOOCs are part of the Complexity Explorer Project at the Santa Fe Institute. Third, I briefly offer some reflections on my experience writing two books: a textbook on chaos and fractals for non-STEM majors and a short expository book on chaos and dynamical systems. A theme that runs through these three projects is an attention to the diversity of ways that mathematical models are constructed and put to use, including non-predictive or qualitative modeling.

  • Stepping Up Complexity in COVID Modeling to New Reality - Vaccines
    (R4A) Glenn Ledder, Mathematics Emeritus, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln NE USA Adding Vaccination to a Disease Model (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Many epidemiological models include vaccination. Usually these assume that individuals in the susceptible class are vaccinated at some rate relative to the susceptible class size. This way of including vaccination is not adequate for the combination of a novel disease with a new vaccine in limited supply and a population with a large fraction of people who refuse vaccination. As an example of how better to incorporate vaccination into an epidemic model, we consider the situation that existed in January 2021, when Delta was surging and vaccines were only just coming on line. In addition to discussing how to incorporate vaccination into a model for Delta, we consider questions about the relative efficacy of vaccination and mitigation in the early days of a vaccine rollout.

  • (R4B) Elena Rosca, Engineering, Ashesi University, Accra GHANA "When can I use this in real life?"- Modelling Project Based Differential Equations (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: "When can I use this in real life?" seems to be the most common question math professors answer. Unfortunately, students are not easily convinced, especially without proof. So, in this quest, while teaching differential equations, I turned to using ordinary differential equation (ode) modeling to investigate relevant situations to demonstrate to students the relevance and applicability of ode. Students were asked to research topics of interest and find peer-reviewed research using ode modeling. This study was the basis of their project, in which students had to explain the model summarize the equations how they were developed. As a next step, the students had to either introduce a modification in the model and investigate the new model or perform a parameter sensitivity analysis. The project findings were present in a mini research paper or a website. Students worked on engineering problems and current situations, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, and demonstrated interest and excitement in the projects.

Day 3 - 6:30 PM–7:30 PM: Free Time

A break in the program with an opportunity to meet colleagues to discuss areas of interest. The conference platform will be open for self-directed dinner conversations.

Day 3 - 7:30 PM–8:30 PM: Student Poster Session

  • Propagation or NOT for Malaria Modeling
    Deborah Enya Esi Debre, Computer Engineering, Ashesi University, Accra GHANA Modelling Mala1ria Propagation: A Factor Significance Analysis (Slides)

    Abstract: Malaria is a potentially life-threatening disease. This project aims to analyse malaria propagation and identify significant parameters in the fight against malaria. The project establishes an encompassing malaria propagation model with the Ross SIR model as a base model. The significant parameters observed through the project include post-exposure infection rate. This parameter is affected by immunity and the rate of loss of post-recovery immunity. In addition, the project deciphers that both the widespread use of Insecticide Treated Mosquito Nets(ITNs) and the implementation of vaccines could be game-changers in the fight. Unfortunately, malaria vaccines are still in the early trial stages, although significant progress has been made. However, ITNs are available on the market and results indicate that their widespread use may result in as much as a 43 percent decline in the human infection rate of malaria. Further work involves the complete approval of a malaria vaccine and factoring its effects into the malaria propagation model.

Day 3 - 8:30 PM–10:00 PM: Escape Room

(M) Julie Barnes, Mathematics, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee NC USA, Shih-Wei Chao, Mathematics, Lucy Garrett Beckham High School, Mt. Pleasant SC USA, Rachel Grotheer, Mathematics, Wofford College, Spartanburg SC USA, Anne Ho, Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN USA, Kerri Jamerson, Mathematics and Computer Science, Mars Hill University, Mars Hill NC USA, Wei-Kai Lai, Mathematics, University of South Carolina Slakehatchie, Walterboro SC USA, Hope McIlwain, Mathematics, Mercer University, Macon GA USA, Benjamin Wilson, Mathematics and Physics, Stevenson University, Owings Mills MD USAMathematical Escape Room

Abstract: You and the other participants of the SIMIODE EXPO 2022 have found themselves trapped in the SIMIODE basement. You must work in teams to find a way out, exploring the diverse basement rooms that coincidentally seem to have a lot in common with the situations differential equations are good at modeling... Use your wit, problem-solving skills, and general trivia knowledge to unlock doors, find clues, and generally have a good time escaping the wild and wonderful SIMIODE basement!

Enjoy this fun mathematical evening activity. Socialize and work as a team to escape a secret room.

Day 3 - 10:00 PM–until: Free Time

The conference platform will be open for informal self-directed conversations and Zoom meetings.

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Day 4: 13 February 2022 (Eastern US Time)

Rooms for events are denoted Rxy for Room Rx, x =1,2,3, . . . and y for part of session y = A is first part and y = B is for second part.

Day 4 - 1:00 PM–1:15 PM: Opening Greeting

Introductions, SOCOCO Platform Orientation, Social Planning, Notions

Day 4 - 1:15 PM–2:00 PM: Keynote Speaker

  • (M) Diana Thomas, Mathematics, United States Military Academy, West Point NY USA Modeling, Validating, and Applying Mathematical Models to Determine Dietary Intake During Weight Loss Interventions (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Eating blueberries can extend your life and soda can contribute to cancer. How do we know this? The most predominant method is "self-report" or keeping food records. There is a large amount of literature that relies on self-reported diet to base scientific conclusions such as the first sentence in this abstract. Subjects who self-report their diets will tell you what you want to hear or what they believe is true, neither of which is reliable to make scientific conclusions. Our team has developed the first thermodynamic differential equation model that estimates dietary intake from body weights during weight loss. I will share with you how this study originated, the model development, where we found the data to validate the model, and verify the unreliability of self-report. I plan to show you why we shouldn't "count" our calories expended during exercise.

Day 4 - 2:00 PM–3:00 PM: Breakout Time

Engage and converse with others with similar interests in these informal breakout sessions.

  • (R1) Moderator Glenn Ledder, Mathematics, University of Nebraska, Lincoln NE USA Building Models for Novel Diseases

    Abstract: We offer a chance for discussions about aspects of modeling in our COVID era.

  • (R2) Moderator Yanping Ma, Mathematics, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles CA USA Holiday mathematics activities - come share yours with all.

    Abstract: You are invited to take this opportunity to discuss ideas for projects or modeling scenarios that are relevant to holidays or festival events. This is a follow-up of the presentation on Day 3, Saturday, 12 February 2022, 4:00-5:00 PM, of this program. Maybe we can work something out of this discussion and share it with more people.

  • (R3) Moderator Diana Thomas, Mathematics, United States Military Academy, West Point NY USA Continuing conversation on dietary modeling and interdisciplinary team work as well as career path discussions.

Day 4 - 3:00 PM–3:45 PM: Presentations on Modeling in All Courses

Simultaneous sessions have two 20 minute presentations with a 5 minute break in between.

  • Modeling Dog Run Dog Swim Dilemma in Calculus I
    (R1A) Timothy Pennings, Mathematics, Davenport University, Grand Rapids MI USA Do Dogs Know Calculus? (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: A standard calculus problem is to find the quickest path from a point on shore to a point in the lake, given that running speed is greater than swimming speed. Elvis, my Welsh Corgi, never had a calculus course. But when we played fetch at Lake Michigan, he appeared to choose paths close to the calculus answer. In this talk we reveal what was found when we experimentally tested this ability.>

  • Minimum Time Path Analysis Applied to Mall Location and Seeing Around a Ball in Calculus I
    (R1B) Brian Winkel, SIMIODE, Chardon OH USA Getting Malled and Seeing Around a Ball (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: What happens to the shape of the one-hour travel neighborhood of a shopping mall when a high speed highway is put through that neighborhood, thus cutting travel time to enable additional mall visitors? Also, how much more of a ball's surface can we see if we place the ball under water?

  • Effective Technology Use in Providing Students Immediate Feedback
    (R2A) Heather Lai, Mechanical Engineering, SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz NY USA Using MATLAB Grader as a platform for student engagement in computer modeling (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: To address the need for immediate feedback to students in an entry level MATLAB based computer simulation course to mechanical and electrical engineering students, the online platform MATLAB Grader was utilized. Different types of structures within the Grader platform were developed based on the focus of the activity or problem being posed, and both formative and summative "code tests" have been developed to lead the students to accurate modeling techniques. Guided questions for the students also were developed to provide mechanisms for students to reflect on the results of their simulations, and communicate understanding of the material covered. Strengths and weaknesses of this type of application will be discussed, with the goal of engaging conversation about this and other platforms for immediate feedback for students when programming.

  • Modeling in Courses - Using Space Program Games
    (R2B) Christopher S. Vaughen, Montgomery County Community College, Blue Bell PA USA Games are Mathematical Models - Explorations with Kerbal Space Program (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Overview of a 2020 NASA grant that introduced precalculus topics to community college students using Kerbal Space Program, ideas for future development and application to the virtual classroom. This presentation is intended for math and physics faculty and students at the undergraduate level teaching and studying algebra, calculus, multivariable calculus, or differential equations.

  • Your Total Source for Modeling Activities - COMAP
    (R3) Kathi Snook, Amanda Beecher, Michelle Isenhour, and Kayla Blyman, COMAP, Bedford MA USA All Things COMAP - Modeling Resources Galore (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Members of the leadership team at COMAP will offer an overview of COMAP with a brief overview of COMAP and its offerings: highlight the celebrated Mathematical Contest in Modeling/Interdisciplinary Contest in Modeling (MCM/ICM), discuss the Certificate in Modeling (CiM) program, explain how COMAP offers a truly vast and rich set of resources to educators for integration of modeling, and provide time for Questions and Answers.

  • Modeling as Motivation in Non-mathematics Major Courses
    (R4A) W. Y. Chan, Mathematics, Texas A&M University – Texarkana, Texarkana TX USA Implementation of Modeling Methods for Non-Mathematics Majors (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: To most students, mathematical modeling is quite new. They are not aware of applying the modeling methods to solve application problems. Students who take the modeling or differential equations course are diverse and come from different majors. In Spring 2021, majority of students taking my modeling and differential equations classes came from non-mathematics disciplines. Those factors bring some challenges to implement the modeling pedagogy. So, the projects assigned were not the same as we might use with mathematics majors. In this talk, we share some interdisciplinary projects that do not require differential equations techniques to solve in a modeling class.

  • Kryptos Kontest, Make that Kryptos Contest
    (R4B) Stuart Boersma, Mathematics, Central Washington University, Ellensburg WA USA Kryptos: A Cryptanalysis Contest for Undergraduates (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Since 2011 we have been organizing a cryptology contest for undergraduates. No special mathematics ability is assumed, just an interest in code breaking. Originally offered as a regional competition, KRYPTOS now attracts competitors from all over the United States, Canada, and Europe. This presentation will describe the competition format, how students can participate, and share a few of the cipher challenges from past competitions.

  • Moving to Applied Mathematics - A Change of Heart and Mind
    (R5A) Adam Rumpf, Applied Mathematics, Florida Polytechnic University, Lakeland FL USA From Math Avoider to Math Curator: How Mathematical Modeling Changed My Life (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: It's no secret that the public at large thinks of math as being boring, static, tedious, and divorced from reality, and for a professional in a STEM field who understands the importance of math this opinion may be difficult to understand. In this talk I will describe my journey from being a chronically indecisive student who at one point quit math to becoming an instructor of applied mathematics who develops mathematical activities and research tools for fun. In particular I would like to use my background as a case study for how introducing students to mathematical modeling can completely change their perception of what math is, and how this can be used to give them a much more enjoyable and fulfilling experience during their math education.

Day 4 - 3:45 PM–4:45 PM: Breakout Time

Engage and converse with others with similar interests in these informal breakout sessions.

  • (R1) Moderator Viktoria Savatorova, Mathematical Sciences, Central Connecticut State University, New Britain CT USA How do I know if my solution is right or wrong? Sanity tests and special cases.
  • (R2) Moderator Christopher S. Vaughen, Montgomery County Community College, Blue Bell PA USA Discussion of gaming in the life of the teaching professorate
  • (R3) Moderators Sara Taylor and Theresa Rahikka, National Security Agency, Fort Meade MD USA Informal Discussions About Opportunities for Mathematicians at National Security Agency

    Abstract: This time is designed to provide for informal discussions and questions about working for the National Security Agency using mathematics. Both students and faculty are encouraged to stop by and learn about the many exciting opportunities at NSA.

Day 4 - 4:45 PM–5:30 PM: Presentations on Modeling Activities

Simultaneous sessions have two 20 minute presentations with a 5 minute break in between.

  • Modeling Activities - Differential Equations
    (R1A) Timothy Pennings, Mathematics, Davenport University, Grand Rapids MI USA Optimizing a Trip Up-River (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Watching a barge being pushed up the mighty Mississippi raised a question: What speed should it be pushed to get it to its destination with minimum energy? If no current, then since E = F x D and F = kv, the slower the better. But a current changes things. Going slow makes for a loooong trip. What is the optimal strategy? We find the optimal speed for a fixed current (Calc I) and a variable current (DE) and also investigate the change when minimize Cost instead of Energy.

  • Analyzing Smart Phone Audio Signals
    (R1B) Kurt Bryan, Mathematics, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute IN USA Fourier Analysis Applied of Signals (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: When teaching introductory boundary value problems like the heat equation, separation of variables and Fourier series are standard tools. But the presentation of Fourier series can be livened up and their wide utility illustrated by showing how they can also be used to analyze the frequency content of audio signals. These types of signals can be collected by students with a smart phone and analyzed, right in class.

  • Energized Modeling in Mechanical Engineering
    (R2A) Heather Lai, Mechanical Engineering, SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz NY USA Teaching Students to Develop System Dynamics ODEs Using Energy Concepts (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Basic models for the dynamic behavior of spring mass dampers, LCR circuits, and Fluid systems all have a similar form based on the components of the system which store and dissipate energy. Based on examples from an undergraduate Mechanical Engineering System Dynamics course, this presentation will describe how students can use similar basic energy concepts to develop ordinary differential equation models of the dynamic behavior of seemingly dissimilar systems.

  • Take a Little Hair There and Place it Over Here
    (R2B) Adde Marshall, Abigale Goulding, and Brooklyn Price, Dixie State University, Saint George UT USA Mathematical Modelling of Hair-Plucking Birds (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Birds in the genus Paridae have been observed pulling hair from live animals. Many birds of this genus have hair in their nest, but not all birds obtain this hair by pulling it off of live animals. Our mathematical model explores the possible motivations of the hair-snatching behavior, as well as the benefits of pulling hair off of live animals versus gathering shedded hair. Furthermore, we factor in climate to gain additional insights on the benefits of having hair in the nest. This is a presentation about an Outstanding Team's submission for the SCUDEM VI 2021.

  • Wet Lab Data Gathering Yields Modeling Activities
    (R3A) Becky Sanft, University of North Carolina, Ashville NC USA and Anne Walter, St. Olaf College, Northfield MN USA Connecting Models to Data through Case Studies and Wet Labs (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Mathematical modeling is inherently collaborative and often requires a breadth of tools, including formulating mathematical equations to model a system, using computational methods to solve the model, and applying statistical techniques to calibrate the model to data and to validate the model. The importance and challenges of parameterizing models with data have been evident throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. In this talk, we discuss our approach to actively engage students in the process of modeling through a collection of case studies and wet labs connecting mathematical models to real data. This work is found in Exploring Mathematical Modeling in Biology Through Case Studies and Experimental Activities, a text that emanated from a course that we co-taught at St. Olaf College.

  • Collaborative Work With Students Leads to Good Things for All
    (R3B) Michael A. Karls, Ball State University, Muncie IN USA An Applied Project-Driven Approach to Undergraduate Research Experiences (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: Early in my career I was approached by a Ball State University student to be an Honors Thesis advisor. Having no clue what constituted an appropriate honors thesis project, I gave the student an open-ended problem to consider – modeling heat flow in a thermos. Not only did the student complete his honors thesis, but the resulting work led to a refereed journal article and opened the door to a very successful series of collaborative undergraduate research projects. All of the problems have the following in common – they are simple to state, open-ended, student driven, mathematically significant, rely on student insight, and require a substantial amount of work on both the student's and my part. Several of these projects have led to a refereed publication that could be used to illustrate topics taught in the undergraduate curriculum. We will look at the process I have developed for this type of research, what works and what doesn't work, and touch on some of the topics explored, namely heat flow, cryptography, and diving boards.

  • Guided Inquiry Learning Approaches to SIMIODE Materials
    (R4) Jacob J. Blazejewski, Mathematics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton MI USA and Nadun Kulasekera Mudiyanselage, Appalachian State University, Boone NC USA Implementing SIMIODE Models in a POGIL Paradigm to Inspire Students (Slides) (Video)

    Abstract: A personal goal in second time teaching differential equations is to highlight their applicability to students in a novel manner. I aim to achieve this in 3 ways: 1) adjust an existing SIMIODE activity to be offered in a Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) paradigm; 2) encourage students to explore a differential equation in their own line of study; 3) outline a plan for a new SIMIODE+POGIL activity for the motion of a spring/mass system.
    The Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) Project aims to create activities that help students construct their own content knowledge and process skills. All activities are expected to be completed by small groups of students where everyone has a unique role to productively contribute to the learning process. Standard roles include a manager to keep the group on task and encourage all members to contribute, a presenter to speak on behalf of the group to the class/instructor, and a recorder to document the group's discussions and share with members later.
    The benefit POGIL can provide to SIMIODE is a structured activity implementation for students and instructors. Additionally, SIMIODE's emphasis on modeling pairs perfectly with POGIL's emphasis on process skills. This semester I am combining SIMIODE and POGIL to explore applications in my elementary differential equations course. In this presentation, I will share my experience and student reactions to a SIMIODE activity on a salt solution mixing problem adapted to the POGIL paradigm. Following this, students will then be asked to explore and find a differential equation they find applicable to their studies or merely interesting to classify. A new SIMIODE+POGIL activity will also be shared for developing the differential equations associated with various cases of the spring/mass system.

Day 4 - 6:00 PM–6:30 PM: Closing and Farewells

We'll have a wrap-up celebration, give our final farewells and ask everyone to complete a conference evaluation. (Slides) (Video)

Day 4 - 6:30 PM–11:00 PM: Free Time

The conference platform will stay open until 11:00 PM to give everyone a chance to visit in small groups, reunite with colleagues, and talk over interesting ideas with other conference participants.

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